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Does collective meditation foster trust and trustworthiness in an investment game?

Listed author(s):
  • Giovanni Bartolomeo

    ()

    (Sapienza University of Rome)

  • Stefano Papa

    ()

    (University of Teramo)

Abstract This research aims to determine whether people exposed to short-term collective meditation display more self-interest or more pro-social behavior in an investment game. We compare the trust and trustworthiness of two groups. Only one group was previously exposed to meditation. We find that this group exhibits more trust and pro-social behavior on average than the other group. However, these effects are temporary.

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File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12232-016-0259-y
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Article provided by Springer & Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS) in its journal International Review of Economics.

Volume (Year): 63 (2016)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 379-392

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Handle: RePEc:spr:inrvec:v:63:y:2016:i:4:d:10.1007_s12232-016-0259-y
DOI: 10.1007/s12232-016-0259-y
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