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Some determinants of trust formation and pro social behaviours in investment games: An experimental study

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  • Di Bartolomeo Giovanni
  • Papa Stefano

Abstract

Abstract This study aims to examine some ‘circumstances’ that may influence trust formation and, in general, pro-social behaviours in game situations characterized by complex strategies, that is, not dichotomous choices. We consider the potential role played by one-way communication (cheap talk), social history, and ‘climate effects’ induced by meditation in a single experiment based on the investment game. Our main findings are that meditation enhances trust formation, while social history and cheap talk have limited or no effect on it—at least on average.
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  • Di Bartolomeo Giovanni & Papa Stefano, 2014. "Some determinants of trust formation and pro social behaviours in investment games: An experimental study," wp.comunite 0112, Department of Communication, University of Teramo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ter:wpaper:0112
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    1. Ben-Ner, Avner & Putterman, Louis & Ren, Ting, 2011. "Lavish returns on cheap talk: Two-way communication in trust games," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 1-13, February.
    2. Tore Ellingsen & Magnus Johannesson, 2004. "Promises, Threats and Fairness," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(495), pages 397-420, April.
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    6. Giovanni Bartolomeo & Stefano Papa, 2016. "Trust and reciprocity: extensions and robustness of triadic design," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 19(1), pages 100-115, March.
    7. Johnson, Noel D. & Mislin, Alexandra A., 2011. "Trust games: A meta-analysis," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 865-889.
    8. repec:kap:iaecre:v:20:y:2014:i:2:p:239-240 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Urs Fischbacher, 2007. "z-Tree: Zurich toolbox for ready-made economic experiments," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 10(2), pages 171-178, June.
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    13. Charness, Gary & Dufwenberg, Martin, 2010. "Bare promises: An experiment," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 107(2), pages 281-283, May.
    14. Giorgio Coricelli & Luis González Morales & Amelie Mahlstedt, 2006. "The Investment Game With Asymmetric Information," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(1), pages 13-30, February.
    15. Bracht, Juergen & Feltovich, Nick, 2009. "Whatever you say, your reputation precedes you: Observation and cheap talk in the trust game," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(9-10), pages 1036-1044, October.
    16. Guido Baltussen & G. Post & Martijn Assem & Peter Wakker, 2012. "Random incentive systems in a dynamic choice experiment," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 15(3), pages 418-443, September.
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