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Lessons learnt from SACMEQII: South African student performance in regional context

Author

Listed:
  • Servaas van der Berg

    (Department of Economics, Stellenbosch University)

  • Megan Louw

    (Department of Economics, Stellenbosch University)

Abstract

In regional context, South African students benefit from above average levels of public and private education resources. However, their performance on international tests – including SACMEQII (Southern African Consortium for Monitoring Educational Quality, 2000) – is extremely weak. The first part of the paper positions South Africa within southern and eastern Africa on the basis of SACMEQII Grade 6 mathematics test scores. Hierarchical linear modelling techniques are then employed to model the relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and schooling in this highly unequal country. Three important drivers of inequity in test scores emerge: principal concern with monitoring student progress, teacher absenteeism and teacher quality. These interact with SES to give richer students a strong advantage.

Suggested Citation

  • Servaas van der Berg & Megan Louw, 2007. "Lessons learnt from SACMEQII: South African student performance in regional context," Working Papers 16/2007, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:sza:wpaper:wpapers47
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    2. Gabrielle Wills & Heleen Hofmeyr, 2018. "Academic Resilience in Challenging Contexts: Evidence From Township and Rural Primary Schools in South Africa," Working Papers 18/2018, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    3. Lam, David & Ardington, Cally & Leibbrandt, Murray, 2011. "Schooling as a lottery: Racial differences in school advancement in urban South Africa," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(2), pages 121-136, July.
    4. Milligan, Lizzi O. & Tikly, Leon & Williams, Timothy & Vianney, Jean-Marie & Uworwabayeho, Alphonse, 2017. "Textbook availability and use in Rwandan basic education: A mixed-methods study," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 1-7.
    5. World Bank, . "Accountability in Public Services in South Africa," World Bank Other Operational Studies, The World Bank, number 29723.
    6. Anthony Kiryagana Isabirye & Kholeka Constance Moloi, 2017. "Exploring Teacher Learning Experiences in one Open University in South Africa: a Training Framework," Journal of Education and Vocational Research, AMH International, vol. 7(4), pages 12-20.
    7. Debra Shepherd, 2013. "A question of efficiency: decomposing South African reading test scores using PIRLS 2006," Working Papers 20/2013, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    8. Mia de Vos, 2011. "Quantitative and qualitative aspects of education in South Africa: An analysis using the National Income Dynamic Study," Working Papers 06/2011, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    9. Chloé van Biljon & Cobus Burger, 2019. "The period effect: the effect of menstruation on absenteeism of school girls in Limpopo," Working Papers 20/2019, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    10. Debra L. Shepherd, 2011. "Constraints to school effectiveness: what prevents poor schools from delivering results?," Working Papers 05/2011, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    education quality; inequality; South Africa; Southern Africa; Hierarchical Linear Modelling;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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