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The performance of low fee independent schools in South Africa - What can available data tell?

Author

Listed:
  • Servaas van der Berg

    () (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

  • Chris van Wyk

    () (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

  • Ronelle Burger

    () (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

  • Janeli Kotzé

    () (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

  • Marlies Piek

    () (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

  • Kate Rich

    () (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

Abstract

This study analysed grade 6 and grade 9 mathematics data from the Annual National Assessment by comparing school performance in public and independent schools in three geographical regions: Western Cape, Gauteng and South Africa as a whole. The aim was to see whether low-fee independent schools outperform public schools i) for schools which have similar school fees and ii) for schools which have similar resources, which is the sum of school fees and government subsidies. Our analysis indicates that independent primary schools, in all three geographical regions, are able to use resources more efficiently and are thus able to translate resources into better performance. However, when comparing schools in similar school fee brackets, the findings are mixed and vary by geographical area: sending a child to an independent primary school in Gauteng is worthwhile, whereas it is not worthwhile in the Western Cape.

Suggested Citation

  • Servaas van der Berg & Chris van Wyk & Ronelle Burger & Janeli Kotzé & Marlies Piek & Kate Rich, 2017. "The performance of low fee independent schools in South Africa - What can available data tell?," Working Papers 01/2017, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:sza:wpaper:wpapers276
    as

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    File URL: https://www.ekon.sun.ac.za/wpapers/2017/wp012017/wp0117.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2017
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tahir Andrabi & Jishnu Das & Asim Ijaz Khwaja & Tristan Zajonc, 2011. "Do Value-Added Estimates Add Value? Accounting for Learning Dynamics," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(3), pages 29-54, July.
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    3. Rob French & Geeta Kingdon, 2010. "The relative effectiveness of private and government schools in Rural India: Evidence from ASER data," DoQSS Working Papers 10-03, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
    4. Desai, Sonalde & Dubey, Amaresh & Vanneman, Reeve & Banerji, Rukmini, 2009. "Private Schooling in India: A New Educational Landscape," India Policy Forum, National Council of Applied Economic Research, vol. 5(1), pages 1-58.
    5. Joshua Angrist & Eric Bettinger & Erik Bloom & Elizabeth King & Michael Kremer, 2002. "Vouchers for Private Schooling in Colombia: Evidence from a Randomized Natural Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1535-1558, December.
    6. Joshua Angrist & Eric Bettinger & Michael Kremer, 2006. "Long-Term Educational Consequences of Secondary School Vouchers: Evidence from Administrative Records in Colombia," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(3), pages 847-862, June.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Public And Independent Schools; Low Fee Schools;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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