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Specialisation, diversification and the ladder of green technology development

Author

Listed:
  • François Perruchas

    () (INGENIO [CSIC-Universitat Politecnica de Valencia], Spain)

  • Davide Consoli

    (INGENIO [CSIC-Universitat Politecnica de Valencia], Spain)

  • Nicolò Barbieri

    () (University of Ferrara, Italy)

Abstract

This paper elaborates an empirical analysis of the temporal and geographical distribution of green technology, and on how specific country characteristics enable or thwart environmental inventive activities. Using patent data on 63 countries over the period 1970-2012 we identify key drivers of cross-country diversification and specialization. Our first finding is that countries diversify towards green technologies that are related to their existing competences. Notably, the maturity of the green technology matters more than the level of development of each country. The second main result is that countries move along cumulative paths of specialization, and towards more complex green technologies. Interestingly, the complexity of green technologies is not an obstacle to further specialisation. The latter holds also for developing countries that are most exposed to climate change hazards.

Suggested Citation

  • François Perruchas & Davide Consoli & Nicolò Barbieri, 2019. "Specialisation, diversification and the ladder of green technology development," SPRU Working Paper Series 2019-07, SPRU - Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex Business School.
  • Handle: RePEc:sru:ssewps:2019-07
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Environmental Technology; Technological diversification; Technological specialisation;

    JEL classification:

    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • Q55 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Technological Innovation

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