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Africa's Green Revolution? The determinants of the adoption of NERICAs in West Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Aliou Diagne

    () (Africa Rice Centre, Cotonou, Benin)

  • Steven Glover

    (Overseas Development Institute, London, UK)

  • Ben Groom

    () (Department of Gography and Environment, London School of Economics, London, UK)

  • Jonathan Phillips

    (Department of Economics, SOAS, University of London, UK)

Abstract

We analyse the rate and determinants of adoption of modern rice varieties (NERICAs) in Guinea, The Gambia and Cote d'Ivoire. The role of knowledge and information is evaluated using programme evaluation methods. Using household data collected by the Africa Rice Centre we show that the exposure and access to seeds lead to radically different levels of adoption by country: 30% in Cote D’Ivoire compared to around 90% for The Gambia and Guinea. Analysis of the determinants of adoption in each country reveals the heterogeneity in the role of agricultural and societal conditions and implies country/province specific policies are appropriate.

Suggested Citation

  • Aliou Diagne & Steven Glover & Ben Groom & Jonathan Phillips, 2012. "Africa's Green Revolution? The determinants of the adoption of NERICAs in West Africa," Working Papers 174, Department of Economics, SOAS, University of London, UK.
  • Handle: RePEc:soa:wpaper:174
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    File URL: http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/research/workingpapers/file76516.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Richard K. Crump & V. Joseph Hotz & Guido W. Imbens & Oscar A. Mitnik, 2009. "Dealing with limited overlap in estimation of average treatment effects," Biometrika, Biometrika Trust, vol. 96(1), pages 187-199.
    2. James J. Heckman & Edward Vytlacil, 2005. "Structural Equations, Treatment Effects, and Econometric Policy Evaluation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(3), pages 669-738, May.
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    4. Lee, Myoung-jae, 2005. "Micro-Econometrics for Policy, Program and Treatment Effects," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199267699.
    5. Foster, Andrew D & Rosenzweig, Mark R, 1995. "Learning by Doing and Learning from Others: Human Capital and Technical Change in Agriculture," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(6), pages 1176-1209, December.
    6. Imbens, Guido W & Angrist, Joshua D, 1994. "Identification and Estimation of Local Average Treatment Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(2), pages 467-475, March.
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    8. Wooldridge, Jeffrey M., 2005. "Violating Ignorability Of Treatment By Controlling For Too Many Factors," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 21(05), pages 1026-1028, October.
    9. Munshi, Kaivan, 2004. "Social learning in a heterogeneous population: technology diffusion in the Indian Green Revolution," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 185-213, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bizimana, Jean-Claude & Richardson, James W., 2018. "Agricultural Technology Assessment for Smallholder Farms in Developing Countries: An Analysis using a Farm Simulation Model (FARMSIM)," 2018 Annual Meeting, February 2-6, 2018, Jacksonville, Florida 266589, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    NERICA Varieties; Technology Adoption; West Africa; Food Security;

    JEL classification:

    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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