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War and Social Attitudes

Author

Listed:
  • Travers Barclay Child
  • Elena Nikolova

    (UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies)

Abstract

We study the long-run effects of conflict on social attitudes, with World War II in Central and Eastern Europe as our setting. Much of earlier work has relied on self-reported measures of victimization, which are prone to endogenous misreporting. With our own survey-based measure, we replicate established findings linking victimization to political participation, civic engagement, optimism, and trust. Those findings are reversed, however, when tested instead with an objective measure of victimization based on historical reference material. Thus, we urge caution when interpreting survey-based results from this literature as causal.

Suggested Citation

  • Travers Barclay Child & Elena Nikolova, 2017. "War and Social Attitudes," UCL SSEES Economics and Business working paper series 2017-5, UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES).
  • Handle: RePEc:see:wpaper:2017:5
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Keywords

    conflict; social attitudes; World War II;
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