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Wage Inequality in Turkey: 2002-2010

  • Bakis, Ozan

    ()

    (Galatasaray University Economic Research Center)

  • Polat, Sezgin

    ()

    (Galatasaray University Economic Research Center)

This paper studies the evolution of wage inequality over the last decade in Turkey using household labor force survey between 2002 and 2010. During the period between 2002 and 2004, the relative supply of more educated workers to less educated workers stayed almost constant while their relative wages have decreased in the benefit of less educated workers. However, in the second period between 2004 and 2010 the relative supply of more educated workers to less educated workers had risen while their relative wages remained constant or kept increasing in the benefit of more educated workers. Both of these developments calls for factors other than those implied by a simple supply-demand model such as skill-biased technical change or minimum wage changes. The decomposition of wage inequality reveals that price(wage) e ect is dominant over the composition particularly in the period between 2002 and 2004. Our results show that the real minimum wage hike in 2004 corresponds to a major institutional change which proves to be welfare increasing in terms of wage inequality. The upper-tail (90/50) wage inequality decreased between 2002 and 2004 and stayed constant thereafter. The lower-tail (50/10) wage inequality decreased smoothly between 2002 and 2010. Our findings provide another evidence to the institutional view.

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Paper provided by Galatasaray University Economic Research Center in its series GIAM Working Papers with number 13-9.

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Length: 33 pages
Date of creation: 16 Jul 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ris:giamwp:2013_009
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  1. Katz, Lawrence F & Murphy, Kevin M, 1992. "Changes in Relative Wages, 1963-1987: Supply and Demand Factors," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(1), pages 35-78, February.
  2. Aysit Tansel & Fatma Bircan, 2011. "Wage Inequality and Returns to Education in Turkey: A Quantile Regression Analysis," Working Papers 2011/1, Turkish Economic Association.
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  4. David H. Autor & Lawrence F. Katz & Alan B. Krueger, 1997. "Computing Inequality: Have Computers Changed the Labor Market?," NBER Working Papers 5956, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  6. David S. Lee, 1999. "WAGE INEQUALITY IN THE UNITED STATES DURING THE 1980s: RISING DISPERSION OR FALLING MINIMUM WAGE?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(3), pages 977-1023, August.
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  9. Mariano Bosch & Marco Manacorda, 2010. "Minimum Wages and Earnings Inequality in Urban Mexico," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(4), pages 128-49, October.
  10. Elena Meschi & Erol Taymaz & Marco Vivarelli, 2010. "Trade, Technology And Skills: Evidence From Turkish Microdata," DISCE - Quaderni del Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali dises1062, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
  11. David Card & Thomas Lemieux & W. Craig Riddell, 2004. "Unions and Wage Inequality," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 25(4), pages 519-562, October.
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  14. Ganguli, Ina & Terrell, Katherine, 2005. "Institutions, Markets and Men's and Women's Wage Inequality: Evidence from Ukraine," IZA Discussion Papers 1724, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  15. Richard B. Freeman, 2009. "Labor Regulations, Unions, and Social Protection in Developing Countries: Market distortions or Efficient Institutions?," NBER Working Papers 14789, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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