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Regional Settlement Infrastructure and Currency Internationalization: The Case of Asia and the Renminbi

Author

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  • Rhee, Changyong

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

  • Sumulong, Lea

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

Abstract

The squeeze in United States dollar liquidity that emerged with the global financial crisis highlighted the risks inherent in the current global financial system. Asia was adversely affected by the crisis not only because of its dependence on trade, but also because of its heavy reliance on the US dollar for regional and international transactions. As Asia’s role in the global economy continues to expand, its dependence on the US dollar is bound to increase, raising further its vulnerability to future liquidity shocks. The use of regional currencies for bilateral trade settlement could reduce such vulnerability. As demonstrated by the renminbi trade settlement scheme piloted between the People’s Republic of China; Hong Kong, China; and Macao, China, the existence of appropriate financial infrastructure could reduce the relatively larger costs of bilateral currency transactions compared with triangular transactions through the United States dollar. As most central banks are securities depositories of government bonds, combining trade settlement with government bond securities settlement could also have large synergy effects without substantial extra costs. This proposal does not require full liberalization of the capital account or full deregulation of capital markets, and is more politically feasible in transition. As such, extending the trade settlement scheme to the rest of Asia and appending a government bond payment and securities settlement system could be a practical solution to international monetary system reform and the diversification of settlement currencies.

Suggested Citation

  • Rhee, Changyong & Sumulong, Lea, 2014. "Regional Settlement Infrastructure and Currency Internationalization: The Case of Asia and the Renminbi," ADBI Working Papers 457, Asian Development Bank Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:adbiwp:0457
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Olivier Jeanne & Arvind Subramanian & John Williamson, 2012. "Who Needs to Open the Capital Account?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 5119, July.
    2. Daekeun Park & Changyong Rhee, 2006. "Building infrastructure for Asian bond markets: settlement and credit rating," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Asian bond markets: issues and prospects, volume 30, pages 202-221, Bank for International Settlements.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mikko Huotari & Sandra Heep, 2016. "Learning geoeconomics: China’s experimental financial and monetary initiatives," Asia Europe Journal, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 153-171, June.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    global financial crisis; international monetary system; renminbi internationalization; renminbi trade settlement; government bond payment and settlement;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions
    • F34 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Lending and Debt Problems
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission

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