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Capital Inflows: The Role of Controls

Author

Listed:
  • Mr. Atish R. Ghosh
  • Mr. Karl F Habermeier
  • Mr. Jonathan David Ostry
  • Mr. Marcos d Chamon
  • Miss Mahvash S Qureshi
  • Dennis B. S. Reinhardt

Abstract

With the global economy beginning to emerge from the financial crisis, capital is flowing back to emerging market countries (EMEs). These flows, and capital mobility more generally, allow countries with limited savings to attract financing for productive investment projects, foster the diversification of investment risk, promote intertemporal trade, and contribute to the development of financial markets. In this sense, the benefits from a free flow of capital across borders are similar to the benefits from free trade (see Reaping the Benefits of Financial Globalization, IMF Occasional Paper 264, 2008), and imposing restrictions on capital mobility means foregoing, at least in part, these benefits, owing to the distortions and resource misallocation that controls give rise to (see Edwards and Ostry, 1992, for an example of how capital controls interact with other distortions in the economy).

Suggested Citation

  • Mr. Atish R. Ghosh & Mr. Karl F Habermeier & Mr. Jonathan David Ostry & Mr. Marcos d Chamon & Miss Mahvash S Qureshi & Dennis B. S. Reinhardt, 2010. "Capital Inflows: The Role of Controls," IMF Staff Position Notes 2010/004, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfspn:2010/004
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. De La Peña, Rogelio, 2021. "Should monetary policy lean against the wind in a small-open economy? Revisiting the Tinbergen rule," Latin American Journal of Central Banking (previously Monetaria), Elsevier, vol. 2(1).
    2. Fischer, Andreas M. & Greminger, Rafael P. & Grisse, Christian & Kaufmann, Sylvia, 2021. "Portfolio rebalancing in times of stress," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 113(C).
    3. Marcel Fratzscher, 2014. "Capital Controls and Foreign Exchange Policy," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series, in: Miguel Fuentes D. & Claudio E. Raddatz & Carmen M. Reinhart (ed.),Capital Mobility and Monetary Policy, edition 1, volume 18, chapter 7, pages 205-253, Central Bank of Chile.
    4. Forbes, Kristin, 2020. "The International Aspects of Macroprudential Policy," CEPR Discussion Papers 15198, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Jeanne, Olivier & Korinek, Anton, 2019. "Managing credit booms and busts: A Pigouvian taxation approach," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 2-17.
    6. Radhika Pandey & Gurnain K. Pasricha & Ila Patnaik & Ajay Shah, 2021. "Motivations for capital controls and their effectiveness," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(1), pages 391-415, January.
    7. Gus, Garita & Chen, Zhou, 2011. "Averting Currency Crises: The Pros and Cons of Financial Openness," MPRA Paper 30218, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Fan, Haichao & Gou, Qin & Peng, Yuchao & Xie, Wenjing, 2020. "Spillover effects of capital controls on capital flows and financial risk contagion," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 105(C).
    9. Binici, Mahir & Das, Mitali, 2021. "Recalibration of capital controls: Evidence from the IMF taxonomy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 110(C).
    10. Ruben Atoyan, 2010. "Beyond the crisis: revisiting emerging Europe’s growth model," Financial Theory and Practice, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 34(4), pages 329-356.
    11. Gómez, Esteban & Murcia, Andrés & Lizarazo, Angélica & Mendoza, Juan Carlos, 2020. "Evaluating the impact of macroprudential policies on credit growth in Colombia," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 42(C).
    12. Rogelio De la Peña, 2021. "Should monetary policy lean against the wind in a small-open economy? Revisiting the Tinbergen rule," Working Papers 2021-01, Banco de México.
    13. Filardo, Andrew J. & Siklos, Pierre L., 2020. "The cross-border credit channel and lending standards surveys," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 67(C).
    14. Renuka Diwan & Zheng Liu & Mark M. Spiegel, 2021. "Capital Flow Surges and Rising Income Inequality," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, vol. 2021(09), pages 01-05, March.
    15. Raquel Almeida Ramos, "undated". "Financial Flows and Exchange Rates: Challenges Faced by Developing Countries," Working Papers 97, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    16. Yilmaz Akyüz, 2012. "The Boom in Capital Flows to Developing Contries : Will It Go Bust Again?," Ekonomi-tek - International Economics Journal, Turkish Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 63-96, January.
    17. Liu, Zheng & Spiegel, Mark M. & Zhang, Jingyi, 2021. "Optimal capital account liberalization in China," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 1041-1061.
    18. Javier Bianchi, 2012. "Comment on "Capital Account Policies and the Real Exchange Rate"," NBER Chapters, in: NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics 2012, pages 43-48, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. K, S Chalapati Rao & Dhar, Biswajit, 2011. "India's FDI Inflows: Trends and Concepts," MPRA Paper 29153, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. André Moreira Cunha & Daniela Magalhães Prates & Pedro Perfeito da Silva, 2020. "External Financial Liberalization and Macroeconomic Performance in Emerging Countries: An Empirical Evaluation of the Brazilian Case," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 51(5), pages 1225-1245, September.

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