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Matching in the housing market with risk aversion and savings

  • Eerola, Essi
  • Määttänen, Niku

Abstract:We develop a model of the housing market that features both financial and matching frictions. In the model, risk-averse households may save or borrow in order to smooth consumption over time and finance owner housing. Each household either rents or owns its house. Some renter households become dissatisfied with rental housing and want to buy a house. Prospective sellers and buyers meet randomly and bargain over the price. We show how the outcome of the bargaining process depends on buyer’s and seller’s asset positions. The results also illustrate how financial frictions magnify the effects of matching frictions. For instance, because of the borrowing constraint, some matches do not result in trade and identical houses are traded at different prices.

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Paper provided by The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy in its series ETLA Working Papers with number 3.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: 11 Jan 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rif:wpaper:3
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  1. Per Krusell & Toshihiko Mukoyama & Ayşegül Şahin, 2010. "Labour-Market Matching with Precautionary Savings and Aggregate Fluctuations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 77(4), pages 1477-1507.
  2. Michiel van Leuvensteijn & J. van Ommeren, 2003. "New evidence of the effect of transaction costs on residential mobility," CPB Discussion Paper 18, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  3. James S. Costain & Michael Reiter, 2004. "Stabilization versus insurance: welfare effects of procyclical taxation under incomplete markets," Working Papers 234, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  4. Charles Ka Yui Leung & Youngman Chun Fai Leong & Siu Kei Wong, 2005. "Housing Price Dispersion: an empirical investigation," Discussion Papers 00012, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Economics.
  5. James Albrecht & Axel Anderson & Eric Smith & Susan Vroman, 2007. "Opportunistic Matching In The Housing Market," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 48(2), pages 641-664, 05.
  6. Essi Eerola & Teemu Lyytikäinen, 2012. "On the role of public price information in housing markets," Working Papers 30, Government Institute for Economic Research Finland (VATT).
  7. Christian A. L. Hilber & Teemu Lyytikäinen, 2012. "The Effect of the UK Stamp Duty Land Tax on Household Mobility," SERC Discussion Papers 0115, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
  8. Paul E. Carrillo, 2012. "An Empirical Stationary Equilibrium Search Model Of The Housing Market," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 53(1), pages 203-234, 02.
  9. Eerola Essi & Määttänen Niku, 2012. "Borrowing Constraints and House Price Dynamics: The Case of Large Shocks," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 16(3), pages 1-36, September.
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