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Financial Frictions, Trade, and Misallocation

Author

Listed:
  • David Kohn

    (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile)

  • Fernando Leibovici

    (Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis)

  • Michal Szkup

    (University of British Columbia)

Abstract

We investigate the extent to which financial frictions shape the effects a trade liberalization has on aggregate total factor productivity (TFP) and capital misallocation. We study a small open economy populated with heterogeneous entrepreneurs who differ in their productivity and are subject to financing constraints. Individuals choose whether to be workers or entrepreneurs, and entrepreneurs choose whether to export or not. We show how financial frictions distort these decisions and aggregate TFP. We calibrate the model to match key features of Chilean plant-level data and use it to quantify TFP losses due to misallocation. We then investigate how the presence of financial constraints affects the output and TFP gains from a trade liberalization. We find that lowering trade barriers has a stronger positive effect in less financially developed economies. The higher profits that result from a trade liberalization allow firms to accumulate assets and relax their credit constraint, which is particularly valuable in economies where firms are severely constrained.

Suggested Citation

  • David Kohn & Fernando Leibovici & Michal Szkup, 2018. "Financial Frictions, Trade, and Misallocation," 2018 Meeting Papers 385, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed018:385
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David Kohn & Fernando Leibovici & Michal Szkup, 2015. "Financial Frictions and Export Dynamics in Large Devaluations," Department of Economics Working Papers 2015_2, Universidad Torcuato Di Tella.
    2. Michal Szkup & Fernando Leibovici & David Kohn, 2011. "Financial Frictions and Export Dynamics," 2011 Meeting Papers 1014, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Andrea Caggese & Vicente Cunat, 2013. "Financing Constraints, Firm Dynamics, Export Decisions, and Aggregate Productivity," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(1), pages 177-193, January.
    4. Fattal Jaef, Roberto N. & Lopez, Jose Ignacio, 2014. "Entry, trade costs, and international business cycles," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 224-238.
    5. Sangeeta Pratap & Carlos Urrutia & Felipe Meza, 2017. "Credit, Misallocation and Productivity Growth: A Disaggregated Analysis," 2017 Meeting Papers 538, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Costas Arkolakis & Arnaud Costinot & Andres Rodriguez-Clare, 2012. "New Trade Models, Same Old Gains?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(1), pages 94-130, February.
    7. Fernando Leibovici, 2013. "Financial Development and International Trade," 2013 Meeting Papers 532, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Timothy Kehoe & Sewon Hur & Kim Ruhl & Jose Asturias, 2015. "The Interaction of Entry Barriers and Financial Frictions in Growth," 2015 Meeting Papers 792, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    9. Alessandro Dovis & Wyatt Brooks, 2011. "Trade Liberalization with Endogenous Borrowing Constraints," 2011 Meeting Papers 631, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    10. Blundell, Richard & Meghir, Costas & Neves, Pedro, 1993. "Labour supply and intertemporal substitution," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1-2), pages 137-160, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. N.R. Ramírez-Rondán & Marco E. Terrones & Andrea Vilchez, 2018. "Does financial sector development affect the growth gains from trade openness?," Working Papers 130, Peruvian Economic Association.

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