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Liquidity effects on asset prices, financial stability and economic resilience

Author

Listed:
  • Dimitrios Tsomocos

    (University of Oxford)

  • Juan Francisco Martinez Sepulveda

    (University of Oxford)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the different channels of shock transmission in an economy affected by financial frictions. We distinguish between the liquidity and default effects on asset prices. Furthermore, we develop a framework in which we can assess financial stability policy under financial frictions. We introduce a simplified model of trade and financial intermediation that captures the effects of shocks on financial and real variables of the economy. Our results suggest that financial stability and economic resilience to adverse shocks should take into account default in the credit market as well as the liquidity of goods traded in the commodity market.

Suggested Citation

  • Dimitrios Tsomocos & Juan Francisco Martinez Sepulveda, 2012. "Liquidity effects on asset prices, financial stability and economic resilience," 2012 Meeting Papers 916, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed012:916
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Acharya, Viral V. & Pedersen, Lasse Heje, 2005. "Asset pricing with liquidity risk," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 375-410, August.
    2. Markus K. Brunnermeier & Lasse Heje Pedersen, 2009. "Market Liquidity and Funding Liquidity," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 22(6), pages 2201-2238, June.
    3. Tsomocos, Dimitrios P., 2003. "Equilibrium analysis, banking, contagion and financial fragility," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 24826, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Charles Goodhart & Pojanart Sunirand & Dimitrios Tsomocos, 2006. "A model to analyse financial fragility," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 27(1), pages 107-142, January.
    5. Pradeep Dubey & John Geanakoplos & Martin Shubik, 2005. "Default and Punishment in General Equilibrium," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(1), pages 1-37, January.
    6. Cúrdia, Vasco & Woodford, Michael, 2016. "Credit Frictions and Optimal Monetary Policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 30-65.
    7. Tsomocos, Dimitrios P., 2003. "Equilibrium analysis, banking and financial instability," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(5-6), pages 619-655, July.
    8. Francisco Covas & Shigeru Fujita, 2010. "Procyclicality of Capital Requirements in a General Equilibrium Model of Liquidity Dependence," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 6(34), pages 137-173, December.
    9. Meh, Césaire A. & Moran, Kevin, 2010. "The role of bank capital in the propagation of shocks," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 555-576, March.
    10. Leao, Emanuel R. & Leao, Pedro R., 2007. "Modelling the central bank repo rate in a dynamic general equilibrium framework," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 571-610, July.
    11. Nobuhiro Kiyotaki & John Moore, 2001. "Liquidity, Business Cycles and Monetary Policy (Clarendon Lectures 2)," ESE Discussion Papers 111, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
    12. Sims, Christopher A, 2002. "Solving Linear Rational Expectations Models," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 20(1-2), pages 1-20, October.
    13. Marimon, Ramon & Scott, Andrew (ed.), 1999. "Computational Methods for the Study of Dynamic Economies," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198294979.
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