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Fragility: A Quantitative Analysis of the US Health Insurance System

Author

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  • Iourii Manovskii

    (University of Pennsylvania)

  • Bjoern Bruegemann

    (Yale University)

Abstract

We develop a quantitative equilibrium model that features tax deductibility of employer-provided coverage, non-discrimination restrictions, fixed costs of coverage and employers that hire discrete numbers of workers in frictional labor markets. We use the calibrated model to understand what drives the patterns of insurance provision with employer size and to evaluate the effects of this system on the flows of workers across health insurance coverage status, labor market flows, as well as on the size distribution of establishments, and aggregate productivity. We also evaluate the effects of various proposed reforms of the system.

Suggested Citation

  • Iourii Manovskii & Bjoern Bruegemann, 2010. "Fragility: A Quantitative Analysis of the US Health Insurance System," 2010 Meeting Papers 787, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed010:787
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marcus Hagedorn & Iourii Manovskii, 2008. "The Cyclical Behavior of Equilibrium Unemployment and Vacancies Revisited," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1692-1706, September.
    2. Thomasson, Melissa A., 2002. "From Sickness to Health: The Twentieth-Century Development of U.S. Health Insurance," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 233-253, July.
    3. Matthew S. Dey & Christopher J. Flinn, 2005. "An Equilibrium Model of Health Insurance Provision and Wage Determination," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(2), pages 571-627, March.
    4. Diego Restuccia & Richard Rogerson, 2008. "Policy Distortions and Aggregate Productivity with Heterogeneous Plants," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(4), pages 707-720, October.
    5. Albrecht, James W & Axell, Bo, 1984. "An Equilibrium Model of Search Unemployment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 92(5), pages 824-840, October.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Harold L. Cole & Soojin Kim & Dirk Krueger, 2012. "Analyzing the Effects of Insuring Health Risks: On the Trade-off between Short Run Insurance Benefits vs. Long Run Incentive Costs," NBER Working Papers 18572, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Didem Tuzemen & Makoto Nakajima, 2014. "Health Care Reform or Labor Market Reform? A Quantitative Analysis of the Affordable Care Act," 2014 Meeting Papers 1325, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Hanming Fang & Naoki Aizawa, 2012. "Equilibrium Labor Market Search and Health Insurance Reform," 2012 Meeting Papers 959, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. Pashchenko, Svetlana & Porapakkarm, Ponpoje, 2010. "Quantitative Analysis of Health Insurance Reform: Separating Community Rating from Income Redistribution," MPRA Paper 26158, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Svetlana Pashchenko & Ponpoje Porapakkarm, 2013. "Quantitative Analysis of Health Insurance Reform: Separating Regulation from Redistribution," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(3), pages 383-404, July.
    6. repec:eee:hapoch:v1_237 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Svetlana Pashchenko & Ponpoje Porapakkarm, 2013. "Quantitative Analysis of Health Insurance Reform: Separating Regulation from Redistribution," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(3), pages 383-404, July.
    8. Rong Hai, 2013. "The Determinants of Rising Inequality in Health Insurance and Wages, Second Version," PIER Working Paper Archive 13-071, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 21 Dec 2013.
    9. Dizioli, Allan & Pinheiro, Roberto, 2016. "Health insurance as a productive factor," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 1-24.
    10. Rong Hai, 2013. "The Determinants of Rising Inequality in Health Insurance and Wages: An Equilibrium Model of Workers' Compensation and Health Care Policies," PIER Working Paper Archive 13-019, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
    11. Rong Hai, 2013. "The Determinants of Rising Inequality in Health Insurance and Wages," Working Papers 2013-007, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.
    12. Anne Villamil & Zhigang Feng, 2017. "Regressive Subsidy to EHI and Entrepreneurial Talent Allocation," 2017 Meeting Papers 1059, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    13. Vincent Pohl, 2014. "Medicaid and the Labor Supply of Single Mothers: Implications for Health Care Reform," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 15-222, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    14. Janicki, Hubert P., 2014. "The role of asset testing in public health insurance reform," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 169-195.
    15. Fang, H., 2016. "Insurance Markets for the Elderly," Handbook of the Economics of Population Aging, Elsevier.
    16. David Chivers & Zhigang Feng & Anne Villamil, 2017. "Employment-based Health Insurance and Misallocation: Implications for the Macroeconomy," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 23, pages 125-149, January.

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