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Unionization Patterns and Firm Reallocation

  • Edgar Preugschat

    (Norwegian School of Management (BI))

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    Abstract The model's transition dynamics are then used to analyze possible causes of the union decline. For instance, a one-time change in the legal environment (as occurred in many Southern states shortly after WW II) implies gradual adjustments in the unionization rate due to cumulative changes in organizing resources. Moreover, the induced effect on firm entry helps to explain the observed co-evolution of unions and firm reallocation (as it happened with the secular shift of manufacturing to the South).

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    File URL: https://www.economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2009/paper_1114.pdf
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    Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2009 Meeting Papers with number 1114.

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    Date of creation: 2009
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    Handle: RePEc:red:sed009:1114
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Society for Economic Dynamics Christian Zimmermann Economic Research Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis PO Box 442 St. Louis MO 63166-0442 USA
    Fax: 1-314-444-8731
    Web page: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/society.htm
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    1. John H. Pencavel, 1971. "The demand for union services: An exercise," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 24(2), pages 180-190, January.
    2. Melitz, Marc J, 2002. "The Impact of Trade on Intra-Industry Reallocations and Aggregate Industry Productivity," CEPR Discussion Papers 3381, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Alex Bryson & Richard B. Freeman, 2006. "What voice do British workers want?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19850, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Richard B. Freeman & Morris M. Kleiner, 1999. "Do unions make enterprises insolvent?," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(4), pages 510-527, July.
    5. Morris M. Kleiner, 2001. "Intensity of Management Resistance: Understanding the Decline of Unionization in the Private Sector," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 22(3), pages 519-540, July.
    6. Johansson, Robert C. & Coggins, Jay S. & Senauer, Benjamin, 1999. "Union Density Effects In The Supermarket Industry," Working Papers 14313, University of Minnesota, The Food Industry Center.
    7. Mathias Dewatripont, 1988. "The impact of trade unions on incentives to deter entry," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/9571, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    8. Harry C. Katz, 1993. "The Decentralization of Collective Bargaining: A Literature Review and Comparative Analysis," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 47(1), pages 3-22, October.
    9. John DiNardo & David S. Lee, 2002. "The Impact of Unionization on Establishment Closure: A Regression Discontinuity Analysis of Representation Elections," NBER Working Papers 8993, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Thomas J. Holmes & Michael Walrath, 2007. "Dynamics of Union Organizations: A Look at Gross Flows in the LORS Files," NBER Working Papers 13212, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Richard B. Freeman & Morris M. Kleiner, 1999. "Do Unions Make Enterprises Insolvent?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(4), pages 510-527, July.
    12. Ebell, Monique & Haefke, Christian, 2006. "Product Market Regulation and Endogenous Union Formation," IZA Discussion Papers 2222, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Hopenhayn, Hugo A, 1992. "Entry, Exit, and Firm Dynamics in Long Run Equilibrium," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(5), pages 1127-50, September.
    14. Harry C. Katz, 1993. "The decentralization of collective bargaining: A literature review and comparative analysis," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 47(1), pages 3-22, October.
    15. Jones, Stephen R G & McKenna, C J, 1994. "A Dynamic Model of Union Membership and Employment," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 61(242), pages 179-89, May.
    16. Charles Brown & James L. Medoff, 2003. "Firm Age and Wages," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(3), pages 677-698, July.
    17. Farber, H.S. & Abowd, J.M., 1990. "Product Market Competition, Union Organizing Activity, And The Employer Resistance," Working papers 551, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    18. Edward P. Lazear, 1981. "A Competitive Theory of Monopoly Unionism," NBER Working Papers 0672, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Farber, Henry S, 1990. "The Decline of Unionization in the United States: What Can Be Learned from Recent Experience," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(1), pages S75-105, January.
    20. David Blanchflower & Alex Bryson, 2002. "Changes over time in union relative wage effects in the UK and the US revisited," NBER Working Papers 9395, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Bronars, Stephen G & Deere, Donald R, 1993. "Union Organizing Activity, Firm Growth, and the Business Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(1), pages 203-20, March.
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