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When does HRM 'Work' in Small British Enterprises?

Author

Listed:
  • Alex Bryson

    () (University College London, National Institute of Social and Economic Research and Institute for the Study of Labor)

  • Michael White

    (Policy Studies Institute, University of Westminster)

Abstract

Using nationally representative workplace data we find substantial use of high-performance work systems (HPWS) in Britain's small enterprises. We find empirical support for the proposition that HPWS have a non-linear association with employees' overall job attitude, with a positive association apparent where HPWS are used intensively. These associations are robust to factors often cited as obstacles to HPWS implementation such as informality and family ownership.

Suggested Citation

  • Alex Bryson & Michael White, 2016. "When does HRM 'Work' in Small British Enterprises?," DoQSS Working Papers 16-01, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
  • Handle: RePEc:qss:dqsswp:1601
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Paul Osterman, 2006. "The Wage Effects of High Performance Work Organization in Manufacturing," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 59(2), pages 187-204, January.
    2. Peter Cappelli & David Neumark, 2001. "Do “High-Performance†Work Practices Improve Establishment-Level Outcomes?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 54(4), pages 737-775, July.
    3. Alex Bryson, 1999. "The impact of employee involvement on small firms' financial performance," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 169(1), pages 78-95, July.
    4. Lai, Yanqing & Saridakis, George & Blackburn, Robert & Johnstone, Stewart, 2016. "Are the HR responses of small firms different from large firms in times of recession?," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 113-131.
    5. John Godard, 2001. "High Performance and the Transformation of Work? The Implications of Alternative Work Practices for the Experience and Outcomes of Work," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 54(4), pages 776-805, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human Resource Management; High-performance Work System; Small Firms; Organisational Commitment; Job Satisfaction;

    JEL classification:

    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • M50 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - General
    • M54 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Labor Management

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