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Rise and Fall of Calendar Anomalies over a Century

Author

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  • Alex Plastun

    (Faculty of Economics and Management, Sumy State University, Sumy, Ukraine)

  • Xolani Sibande

    (Department of Economics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa)

  • Rangan Gupta

    (Department of Economics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa)

  • Mark E. Wohar

    (College of Business Administration, University of Nebraska, USA and School of Business and Economics, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU, UK.)

Abstract

In this paper, we conduct a comprehensive investigation of calendar anomaly evolution in the US stock market (given by the Dow Jones Industrial Average) for the 1900 to 2018 period. We employ various statistical techniques (average analysis, Student’s t-test, ANOVA, the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests) and the trading simulation approach to analyse the evolution of the following calendar anomalies: day of the week effect, turn of the month effect, turn of the year effect, and the holiday effect. The results revealed that ‘golden age’ of calendar anomalies was in the middle of the 20th century. However, since the 1980s all calendar anomalies disappeared. This is consistent with the Efficient Market Hypothesis.

Suggested Citation

  • Alex Plastun & Xolani Sibande & Rangan Gupta & Mark E. Wohar, 2019. "Rise and Fall of Calendar Anomalies over a Century," Working Papers 201902, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:pre:wpaper:201902
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    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Gkillas, Konstantinos & Vortelinos, Dimitrios I. & Babalos, Vassilios & Wohar, Mark E., 2021. "Day-of-the-week effect and spread determinants: Some international evidence from equity markets," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 268-288.
    2. Plastun, Alex & Sibande, Xolani & Gupta, Rangan & Wohar, Mark E., 2020. "Price gap anomaly in the US stock market: The whole story," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 52(C).
    3. Plastun, Alex & Sibande, Xolani & Gupta, Rangan & Wohar, Mark E., 2020. "Historical evolution of monthly anomalies in international stock markets," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 52(C).
    4. Plastun, Alex & Sibande, Xolani & Gupta, Rangan & Wohar, Mark E., 2021. "Evolution of price effects after one-day abnormal returns in the US stock market," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 57(C).
    5. Alex Plastun & Elie Bouri & Rangan Gupta & Qiang Ji, 2021. "Price Effects after One-Day Abnormal Returns in Developed and Emerging Markets: ESG versus Traditional Indices," Working Papers 202119, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Calendar Anomalies; Day of the Week Effect; Turn of the Month Effect; Turn of the Year Effect; Holiday Effect; Stock Market; Dow Jones Industrial Average Index;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques

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