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Structural Breaks in Renewable Energy in South Africa: A Bai and Perron Break Test Application

Listed author(s):
  • Jaco P. Weideman

    (Department of Economics, University of Pretoria)

  • Roula Inglesi-Lotz

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Pretoria)

South Africa has been struggling to cope with its energy demand. In order to remedy the problem, the government of South Africa has committed itself to pursuing renewable energy as a viable alternative to traditional sources such as fossil fuels. The aim of this study is to understand whether or not the policies pursued by the South African government in the period 1990-2010 have had any effect on the behaviour of consumers and producers of renewable energy. To this end, the Bai and Perron (1998, 2003) break test methodology is employed to understand how renewable energy production and consumption series have evolved over this period. Deviations from the base case are then explained in the South African economic and policy context.

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File URL: http://www.up.ac.za/media/shared/61/WP/wp_2016_36.zp85751.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Pretoria, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 201636.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2016
Handle: RePEc:pre:wpaper:201636
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PRETORIA, 0002

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Web page: http://www.up.ac.za/economics

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