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The Optimal Mix of Monetary and Climate Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Chen, Chuanqi
  • Pan, Dongyang

Abstract

Given central banks' recent interest in "greening the financial system", this research theoretically investigates the relationship between monetary and climate policy and tries to find their “optimal mix”. We build an Environmental Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium (E-DSGE) model with the consideration of illegal emission which is pervasive in many countries. According to the model, we find: First, the dynamic of monetary policy is influenced by the selection of regimes of climate policy and the effectiveness of enforcement of environmental regulation. Second, the coefficients in the traditional Taylor rule of monetary policy can be better set to enhance welfare when a certain regime of climate policy is given in the economy. This helps find the constrained optimums of a policy mix. Third, if the mitigation of climate change is augmented into the target of monetary policy, the economy’s welfare can be enhanced. However, under certain circumstances, a dilemma in such monetary policy makes it incompatible with the traditional mandate of central bank.

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Chuanqi & Pan, Dongyang, 2020. "The Optimal Mix of Monetary and Climate Policy," MPRA Paper 97718, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:97718
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Optimal Mix; Monetary Policy; Climate Policy; E-DSGE;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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