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The transmission of foreign financial crises to South Africa: a firm-level study

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  • Boshoff, Willem H.

Abstract

The process of financial integration has increased the exposure of South African financial markets to foreign financial crises. This paper contributes to the understanding of crisis transmission by evaluating several hypotheses that claim to explain how financial crises are transmitted to South African financial markets. The study proceeds from a firm-level perspective, which it argues overcomes the potential loss of information when using aggregate economic data. Consequently, the different transmission hypotheses are evaluated for the East Asian, Russian and Argentinean crises using firm-level daily stock return data from the JSE Securities Exchange. A multivariate regression model, supplemented by sensitivity tests, forms the core of the empirical methodology.

Suggested Citation

  • Boshoff, Willem H., 2006. "The transmission of foreign financial crises to South Africa: a firm-level study," MPRA Paper 9029, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:9029
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/9029/1/MPRA_paper_9029.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. William F. Sharpe, 1963. "A Simplified Model for Portfolio Analysis," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 9(2), pages 277-293, January.
    2. Graciela L. Kaminsky & Carmen Reinhart, 2003. "The Center and the Periphery: The Globalization of Financial Turmoil," NBER Working Papers 9479, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Ratna Sahay & Deepak Mishra & Poonam Gupta, 2003. "Output Response to Currency Crises," IMF Working Papers 03/230, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Graciela L. Kaminsky & Carmen M. Reinhart & Carlos A. VĂ©gh, 2003. "The Unholy Trinity of Financial Contagion," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(4), pages 51-74, Fall.
    5. Glick, Reuven & Rose, Andrew K., 1999. "Contagion and trade: Why are currency crises regional?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 603-617, August.
    6. Renee Fry & Vance Martin & Brenda Gonzalez-Hermosillo & Mardi Dungey, 2002. "International Contagion Effects from the Russian Crisis and the LTCM Near-Collapse," IMF Working Papers 02/74, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Falkenstein, Eric G, 1996. " Preferences for Stock Characteristics as Revealed by Mutual Fund Portfolio Holdings," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 51(1), pages 111-135, March.
    8. D. Collins & N. Biekpe, 2003. "Contagion And Interdependence In African Stock Markets," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 71(1), pages 181-194, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nicolas Berman & Philippe Martin, 2012. "The Vulnerability of Sub-Saharan Africa to Financial Crises: The Case of Trade," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 60(3), pages 329-364, September.
    2. Tennant, David, 2011. "Factors impacting on whether and how businesses respond to early warning signs of financial and economic turmoil: Jamaican firms in the global crisis," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 63(5), pages 472-491, September.
    3. Nicolas Berman & Philippe Martin, 2012. "The Vulnerability of Sub-Saharan Africa to Financial Crises: the Case of Trade," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/lj8ndsutc8i, Sciences Po.
    4. Duygun, Meryem & Isaksson, Anders & Kaulich, Florian, 2016. "Did the global financial crisis hit Africa? Insights from a multi-country firm level survey," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 308-316.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial contagion; crisis; South Africa; financial linkages;

    JEL classification:

    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration

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