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Political Violence, Domestic Violence, and Children's Health: The Case of Pakistan

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  • Parlow, Anton

Abstract

I estimate the impact of political violence (i.e. terrorism) and domestic violence (i.e. intimate partner violence) on child health outcomes. Given that there is a strand of literature showing that armed conflicts, and thus, political violence, increase the likelihood of violence within a household, I test for this possible link as well as the combined effect of these two types of violence on children's height. I find a separate negative effect of both violence outcomes on children's height, but an insignificant combined effect of these two types of violence. Thus, mothers experiencing violence through the partner and violence in their environment through terrorism, have children not significantly shorter than others.

Suggested Citation

  • Parlow, Anton, 2017. "Political Violence, Domestic Violence, and Children's Health: The Case of Pakistan," MPRA Paper 82966, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:82966
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    Keywords

    Armed Conflicts; Domestic Violence; Children's Health;

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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