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Determinants of personality and skill development in the Socio-emotional environment during childhood

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  • Reuß, Karsten

Abstract

This study investigates the importance of different socio-economic conditions on skill formation by using German data from a longitudinal study, the Mannheim Study of Children at Risk, starting at birth. A rich set of psychometric variables regarding the socio-emotional environment from birth until late childhood is assessed. The paper extends previous approaches by splitting up the information on the environment into several dimensions. The results could help policy makers to design educational interventions. Birth risk and the early mother-child interaction are the most important determinants in infancy. In middle childhood cognitive skills can be enhanced by parents who stimulate child play with appropriate play materials and by parental support in learning numbers, shapes or letters. Personality rather tends to be linked to a harmonious and motivational parent-child relationship, in particular a positive emotional climate and the stimulation of independence. Early investments are the most important, but should be complemented by investments in late childhood to unfold their benefits.

Suggested Citation

  • Reuß, Karsten, 2011. "Determinants of personality and skill development in the Socio-emotional environment during childhood," MPRA Paper 82818, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:82818
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/82818/1/MPRA_paper_82818.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Blomeyer, Dorothea & Laucht, Manfred & Pfeiffer, Friedhelm & Reuß, Karsten, 2010. "Mutter-Kind-Interaktion im Säuglingsalter, Familienumgebung und Entwicklung früher kognitiver und nicht-kognitiver Fähigkeiten: Eine prospektive Studie," ZEW Discussion Papers 10-041, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    3. James Heckman & Flavio Cunha, 2007. "The Technology of Skill Formation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 31-47, May.
    4. Douglas Almond & Lena Edlund & Mårten Palme, 2009. "Chernobyl's Subclinical Legacy: Prenatal Exposure to Radioactive Fallout and School Outcomes in Sweden," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(4), pages 1729-1772.
    5. Coneus, Katja & Laucht, Manfred & Reuß, Karsten, 2012. "The role of parental investments for cognitive and noncognitive skill formation—Evidence for the first 11 years of life," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 189-209.
    6. Doyle, Orla & Harmon, Colm P. & Heckman, James J. & Tremblay, Richard E., 2009. "Investing in early human development: Timing and economic efficiency," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 1-6, March.
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    11. Pfeiffer, Friedhelm & Reuß, Karsten, 2008. "Age-dependent skill formation and returns to education," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 631-646, August.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    cognitive skills; personality; multidimensional investments; socio-emotional environment; childhood; partial least squares;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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