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How do educational transfers affect child labour supply and expenditures? Evidence from Indonesia of impact and flypaper effects

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  • de Silva, Indunil
  • Sumarto, Sudarno

Abstract

This study utilises a large nationally representative household survey of unusual scope and richness from Indonesia to analyse how the receipt of educational transfers, scholarships and related assistance programmes affects the labour supply of children and the marginal spending behaviour of households on children’s educational goods. We found strong evidence of educational cash transfers and related assistance programmes significantly decreasing the time spent by children in income-generating activities in Indonesia. Households receiving educational transfers, scholarships and assistance were also found to spend more at the margin on voluntary educational goods. These results were stronger for children living in poor families. Our results are particularly relevant for understanding the role of cash transfers and educational assistance in middle-income countries where enrolment rates are already at satisfactory levels, but the challenge is to keep the students in school at post-primary levels

Suggested Citation

  • de Silva, Indunil & Sumarto, Sudarno, 2014. "How do educational transfers affect child labour supply and expenditures? Evidence from Indonesia of impact and flypaper effects," MPRA Paper 65311, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 19 Dec 2014.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:65311
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hidayatina, Achsanah & Garces-Ozanne, Arlene, 2019. "Can cash transfers mitigate child labour? Evidence from Indonesia’s cash transfer programme for poor students in Java," World Development Perspectives, Elsevier, vol. 15(C), pages 1-1.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child labour; cash transfers; education expenditures and flypaper effects.;

    JEL classification:

    • D6 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics
    • H4 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

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