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Protecting Education for the Poor in Times of Crisis: An Evaluation of a Scholarship Program in Indonesia

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  • Robert Sparrow

    (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam & Tinbergen Institute)

Abstract

This paper analyses the impact of an Indonesian scholarship program, which was implemented in 1998 to preserve access to education for the poor during the economic crisis. Scholarships were targeted pro-poor and the allocation process followed a decentralised design, involving both geographic and individual targeting. The identification strategy exploits this decentralised structure, relying on instrumental variables constructed from regional mis-targeting at the initial phase of allocation. The program has increased enrolment, especially for primary school aged children from poor rural households. Moreover, the scholarships seem to have assisted households in smoothing consumption during the crisis, relieving pressure on households' investments in education and utilisation of child labour.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Sparrow, 2005. "Protecting Education for the Poor in Times of Crisis: An Evaluation of a Scholarship Program in Indonesia," Development and Comp Systems 0501009, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0501009
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 41
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cameron, Lisa A., 2002. "Did social safety net scholarships reduce drop-out rates during the Indonesian economic crisis?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2800, The World Bank.
    2. Rawlings, Laura B.*Rubio, Gloria M., 2003. "Evaluating the impact of conditional cash transfer programs : lessons from Latin America," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3119, The World Bank.
    3. Canagarajah, Sudharshan & Coulombe, Harold, 1997. "Child labor and schooling in Ghana," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1844, The World Bank.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social safety net; program evaluation; education; child labour; Asian economic crisis;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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