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China, the Dollar Peg and U.S. Monetary Policy

  • Tervala, Juha

I examine the transmission of expansionary U.S. monetary policy in case where developing countries-including China-peg their currencies to the dollar. I evaluate the value of the dollar peg as a fraction of consumption that households would be willing to pay for the dollar peg to remain as well off under the dollar peg as under a flexible exchange rate. The value of the dollar peg is positive for the dollar bloc because the U.S. can no longer improve its terms of trade at the dollar bloc's expense. This provides a rationale for fixing the exchange rate. If the expenditure switching effect is weak, the peg is harmful to the U.S., providing a rationale for criticism of China's exchange rate policy.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/53223/1/MPRA_paper_53223.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 53223.

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Date of creation: 27 Jan 2014
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:53223
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