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Coal Consumption: An Alternate Energy Resource to Fuel Economic Growth in Pakistan

  • Satti, Saqlain Latif
  • Hassan, Muhammad shahid
  • Mahmood, Haider
  • Shahbaz, Muhammad

This study is an attempt to revisit the causal relationship between coal consumption and economic growth in case of Pakistan. The present study covers the period of 1974-2010. The direction of causality between the variable is investigated by applying the VECM Granger causality approach. Our findings have exposed that there exists bidirectional Granger causality between economic growth and coal consumption. The Cumulative Sum (CUSUM) and Cumulative Sum of Square (CUSUMSQ) diagrams have not found any structural instability over the period of 1974-2010.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/50147/1/MPRA_paper_50147.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 50147.

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Date of creation: 07 Sep 2013
Date of revision: 17 Sep 2013
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:50147
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