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The Macroeconomics evaluation of Climate Change Model (MECC-Model): The case Study of China

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  • Ruiz Estrada, Mario Arturo

Abstract

Global climate change has a potentially large impact on economic growth but measuring their economic impact is subject to a great deal of uncertainty. The central objective of our paper is to set forth a model – the macroeconomics evaluation of climate change (MECC) model – to evaluate the impact of climate change on GNP growth. The model is based on five basic indicators – (i) the climate change growth rates (αi); (ii) the national climate change vulnerability rate (ΩT); (iii) the climate change magnitude rate (Π); (iv) the economic desgrowth rate (δ); (v) and the CC-Surface. In addition, we apply the MECC Model to the case of China to evaluate its impact on the Chinese economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Ruiz Estrada, Mario Arturo, 2013. "The Macroeconomics evaluation of Climate Change Model (MECC-Model): The case Study of China," MPRA Paper 49158, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 18 Aug 2013.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:49158
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Falk Ita & Mendelsohn Robert, 1993. "The Economics of Controlling Stock Pollutants: An Efficient Strategy for Greenhouse Gases," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 76-88, July.
    2. Gunnar Luderer & Valentina Bosetti & Michael Jakob & Marian Leimbach & Jan Steckel & Henri Waisman & Ottmar Edenhofer, 2012. "The economics of decarbonizing the energy system—results and insights from the RECIPE model intercomparison," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 114(1), pages 9-37, September.
    3. Nils Roll-Hansen, 2013. "A problematic social science approach to the study of climate science," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 119(3), pages 561-563, August.
    4. Stephen C Peck & Thomas J. Teisberg, 1992. "CETA: A Model for Carbon Emissions Trajectory Assessment," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 55-78.
    5. Ruiz Estrada, Mario Arturo, 2011. "Policy modeling: Definition, classification and evaluation," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 523-536, July.
    6. Ottmar Edenhofer & Carlo Carraro & Jean-Charles Hourcade, 2012. "On the economics of decarbonization in an imperfect world," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 114(1), pages 1-8, September.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate change; economic desgrowth; China;

    JEL classification:

    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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