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Does Piped Water Improve Household Welfare? Evidence from Vietnam

Author

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  • Nguyen Viet, Cuong

Abstract

Clean water is essential for human survival. Yet, many people do not have access to clean water in Vietnam. Only around 23% of the population had access to piped water in 2006. This study measures the effect of piped water on household welfare using difference-in-differences estimators and panel data from the Vietnam Household Living Standard Surveys. Findings show that the effect of piped water on household income and labor supply is positive but small and not statistically significant. The effect of piped water on sickness of household members is negative but not statistically significant.

Suggested Citation

  • Nguyen Viet, Cuong, 2011. "Does Piped Water Improve Household Welfare? Evidence from Vietnam," MPRA Paper 40776, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:40776
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/40776/1/MPRA_paper_40776.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gamper-Rabindran, Shanti & Khan, Shakeeb & Timmins, Christopher, 2010. "The impact of piped water provision on infant mortality in Brazil: A quantile panel data approach," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(2), pages 188-200, July.
    2. A. Smith, Jeffrey & E. Todd, Petra, 2005. "Does matching overcome LaLonde's critique of nonexperimental estimators?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 125(1-2), pages 305-353.
    3. Gerking, Shelby & Stanley, Linda R, 1986. "An Economic Analysis of Air Pollution and Health: The Case of St. Louis," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(1), pages 115-121, February.
    4. Dasgupta, Purnamita, 2004. "Valuing health damages from water pollution in urban Delhi, India: a health production function approach," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(01), pages 83-106, February.
    5. James J. Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Petra E. Todd, 1997. "Matching As An Econometric Evaluation Estimator: Evidence from Evaluating a Job Training Programme," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(4), pages 605-654.
    6. Jalan, Jyotsna & Ravallion, Martin, 2003. "Does piped water reduce diarrhea for children in rural India?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 153-173, January.
    7. Rajeev H. Dehejia & Sadek Wahba, 2002. "Propensity Score-Matching Methods For Nonexperimental Causal Studies," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(1), pages 151-161, February.
    8. Florencia Devoto & Esther Duflo & Pascaline Dupas & William Parienté & Vincent Pons, 2012. "Happiness on Tap: Piped Water Adoption in Urban Morocco," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 4(4), pages 68-99, November.
    9. Gunther, Isabel & Fink, Gunther, 2010. "Water, sanitation and children's health : evidence from 172 DHS surveys," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5275, The World Bank.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Piped water; household welfare; income; household survey; Vietnam;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water

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