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The child health implications of privatizing Africa’s urban water supply:

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  • Kosec, Katrina

Abstract

Can private-sector participation (PSP) in the urban piped water sector improve child health? The author uses child-level data from 39 African countries during 1986–2010 to show that introducing PSP decreases diarrhea among urban dwelling children under five years of age by 5.6 percentage points, or 35 percent of its mean prevalence.

Suggested Citation

  • Kosec, Katrina, 2013. "The child health implications of privatizing Africa’s urban water supply:," IFPRI discussion papers 1269, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1269
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    1. #HEJC papers for September 2013
      by academichealtheconomists in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2013-09-01 04:01:38

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    Keywords

    Privatization; Public health; Water supply; urban population; Children; Government policy; Water management; Water policies; Public policy;
    All these keywords.

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