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Libertad y desempeño económico
[Freedom and economic performance]

  • Mejía Cubillos, Javier

From a broad philosophical framework, this paper addresses the relation between freedom and economic performance. It argues for the thesis that, although a liberal system does not guarantee absolute harmony, is the only "convenient" and morally valid for a modern society. The core of this argument is the acceptance of the permanent uncertainty about the great results of the world and the inability of a central entity to control them.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 37939.

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Date of creation: Jan 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:37939
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  1. Brainerd, Elizabeth, 2006. "Reassessing the Standard of Living in the Soviet Union: An Analysis Using Archival and Anthropometric Data," IZA Discussion Papers 1958, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Ron Shachar, 1993. "Forgetfulness And The Political Cycle," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 5(1), pages 15-25, 03.
  3. Hans Gersbach, 2001. "Competition of Politicians for Incentive Contracts and Elections," CESifo Working Paper Series 406, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Otto Swank & Bauke Visser, 2006. "Do elections lead to informed public decisions?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 129(3), pages 435-460, December.
  5. Kevin M. Murphy & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1988. "Industrialization and the Big Push," NBER Working Papers 2708, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Iconio Garrì, 2010. "Political short-termism: a possible explanation," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 145(1), pages 197-211, October.
  7. Ricardo Hausmann & Lant Pritchett & Dani Rodrik, 2005. "Growth Accelerations," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 303-329, December.
  8. Brainerd, Elizabeth & Cutler, David M., 2005. "Autopsy on an Empire: Understanding Mortality in Russia and the Former Soviet Union," IZA Discussion Papers 1472, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Kenneth Kasa, 2012. "A Behavioral Defense of Rational Expectations," Discussion Papers dp12-05, Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University.
  10. Steven G. Medema, 2007. "The Hesitant Hand: Mill, Sidgwick, and the Evolution of the Theory of Market Failure," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 39(3), pages 331-358, Fall.
  11. Deborah Redman, 1995. "La teoría de la ciencia de Karl Popper y la econometría," REVISTA CUADERNOS DE ECONOMÍA, UN - RCE - CID, December.
  12. Berggren, Niclas, 2003. "The Benefits of Economic Freedom: A Survey," Ratio Working Papers 4, The Ratio Institute.
  13. Markus Müller, 2007. "Motivation of politicians and long-term policies," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 132(3), pages 273-289, September.
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