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Factors affecting the location of payday lending and traditional banking services in North Carolina

Author

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  • Burkey, Mark L.
  • Simkins, Scott P.

Abstract

Payday lending is a relatively new and fast growing segment of the “fringe banking” industry. This paper offers a comparative, descriptive analysis of the location patterns of traditional banks and payday lenders. Utilizing a dataset at the Zip Code Tabulation Area level in North Carolina, we perform negative binomial regressions and find evidence supporting some, but not all common assertions about the location patterns of both types of institutions. A key finding is that after controlling for many covariates, race is still a powerful predictor of the locations of both banks and payday lenders.

Suggested Citation

  • Burkey, Mark L. & Simkins, Scott P., 2004. "Factors affecting the location of payday lending and traditional banking services in North Carolina," MPRA Paper 36043, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:36043
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Barth,James R. & Caprio,Gerard & Levine,Ross, 2008. "Rethinking Bank Regulation," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521709309, March.
    2. Sapienza, Paola, 2004. "The effects of government ownership on bank lending," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 357-384, May.
    3. Bin Dong & Benno Torgler, 2010. "The Causes of Corruption: Evidence from China," Working Papers 2010.72, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    4. Giovanni Ferri, 2008. "Banking In China: Are New Tigers Supplanting the Mammoths?," Working Papers 052008, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    5. Richard Podpiera, 2006. "Progress in China’s Banking Sector Reform; Has Bank Behavior Changed?," IMF Working Papers 06/71, International Monetary Fund.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. H. Damar, 2009. "Why Do Payday Lenders Enter Local Markets? Evidence from Oregon," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 34(2), pages 173-191, March.
    2. Tony E. Smith & Marvin M. Smith & John Wackes, 2007. "Alternative financial service providers and the spatial void hypothesis," Community Affairs Discussion Paper 07-01, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    3. Richard W. Evans, 2012. "Determinants of Short-term Consumer Lending Interest Rates," BYU Macroeconomics and Computational Laboratory Working Paper Series 2012-07, Brigham Young University, Department of Economics, BYU Macroeconomics and Computational Laboratory.
    4. Robin A. Prager, 2009. "Determinants of the locations of payday lenders, pawnshops and check-cashing outlets," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2009-33, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    5. Snarr, Hal W. & Burkey, Mark L., 2006. "A Preliminary Investigation of Welfare Migration Induced by Time Limits," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 36(2).
    6. Taylor Canann & Richard Evans, 2015. "Determinants of Short-term Lender Location and Interest Rates," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 48(3), pages 235-262, December.
    7. Smith, Tony E. & Smith, Marvin M. & Wackes, John, 2008. "Alternative financial service providers and the spatial void hypothesis," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 205-227, May.
    8. Wilson Bart J & Findlay David W. & Meehan James W. & Wellford Charissa & Schurter Karl, 2010. "An Experimental Analysis of the Demand for Payday Loans," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-31, October.
    9. Scott Hegerty, 2016. "Commercial bank locations and “banking deserts”: a statistical analysis of Milwaukee and Buffalo," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 56(1), pages 253-271, January.
    10. Scott W. Hegerty, 2016. "Commercial bank locations and “banking deserts”: a statistical analysis of Milwaukee and Buffalo," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 56(1), pages 253-271, January.
    11. Wheatley, W. Parker, 2010. "Economic and Regional Determinants of the Location of Payday Lenders and Banking Institutions in Mississippi: Reconsidering the Role of Race and Other Factors in Firm Location," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 40(1), pages 53-69.
    12. Terri Friedline & Nancy Kepple, 2017. "Does Community Access to Alternative Financial Services Relate to Individuals’ Use of These Services? Beyond Individual Explanations," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 51-79, March.
    13. Goodstein, Ryan M. & Rhine, Sherrie L.W., 2017. "The effects of bank and nonbank provider locations on household use of financial transaction services," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 91-107.
    14. Robin Prager, 2014. "Determinants of the Locations of Alternative Financial Service Providers," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 45(1), pages 21-38, August.
    15. Anping Chen & Marlon Boarnet & Mark Partridge & Christopher S. Fowler & Jane K. Cover & Rachel Garshick Kleit, 2014. "The Geography Of Fringe Banking," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(4), pages 688-710, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    payday lending; fringe banking; location analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General
    • L89 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Other
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models

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