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Sobre a Demanda Agregada por Carnes no Mercado Brasileiro
[On the Demand for Meat in Brazil]

Author

Listed:
  • Resende Filho, M A
  • Bressan, V G F
  • Braga, M J
  • Bressan, A A

Abstract

We used alternative specifications of the Almost Ideal Demand System to estimate the aggregate demand for beef, pork, chicken, and other consumption goods and their elasticities in Brazil. We detected the need for using time trend variables in models’ equations so that an upward trend for each meat demand and a downward trend for other consumption goods were found. The dummy variable for the prices stabilization macroeconomic Real Plan indicated it has not affected demands. According to Marshallian own-price elasticities, demands for meats are inelastic and the demand for other consumption goods is elastic. Cross-price Marshallian and Hicksian elasticities confirm beef, pork and chicken are substitutes one to each other. Expenditure elasticities showed all goods are normal, except for pork which is an inferior good. As personal consumption expenditure increases over time, ceteris paribus, meat consumption will lose importance to other consumption goods, beef consumption will lose importance to chicken, and pork consumption will lose importance to the other types of meat.

Suggested Citation

  • Resende Filho, M A & Bressan, V G F & Braga, M J & Bressan, A A, 2011. "Sobre a Demanda Agregada por Carnes no Mercado Brasileiro
    [On the Demand for Meat in Brazil]
    ," MPRA Paper 31818, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:31818
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/31818/1/MPRA_paper_31818.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Meat demand; Almost Ideal Demand System; elasticities; Brazil;

    JEL classification:

    • Q11 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Aggregate Supply and Demand Analysis; Prices
    • Q13 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Markets and Marketing; Cooperatives; Agribusiness
    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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