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University quality, interregional brain drain and spatial inequality. The case of Italy

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  • Ciriaci, Daria

Abstract

Universities are increasingly recognized as key driver of economic development through their role in knowledge production and human capital accumulation, and as attraction poles for talents. That is why this paper analyses the sequential migration behaviour of Italian students-graduates before their enrolment at university, and after graduation, and the role that university quality has in these choices. From a regional development perspective, a better understanding of the causes of Italian interregional brain drain may help to guide policy intervention aimed at reversing or partially compensating for its negative effects on the source regions. The results confirm ‘university quality’ as a «supply» tool for policy makers to counterbalance the negative effects of the brain drain on human capital accumulation.

Suggested Citation

  • Ciriaci, Daria, 2009. "University quality, interregional brain drain and spatial inequality. The case of Italy," MPRA Paper 30015, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 31 Mar 2011.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:30015
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/30015/1/MPRA_paper_30015.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Nicola Francesco Dotti & Ugo Fratesi & Camilla Lenzi & Marco Percoco, 2013. "Local Labour Markets and the Interregional Mobility of Italian University Students," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(4), pages 443-468, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ciriaci, Daria & Muscio, Alessandro, 2010. "Does university choice drive graduates’ employability?," MPRA Paper 22846, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Nifo, Annamaria & Pagnotta, Stefano & Scalera, Domenico, 2011. "The best and brightest. Selezione positiva e brain drain nelle migrazioni interne italiane
      [The best and brightest. Positive selection and brain drain in Italian internal migrations]
      ," MPRA Paper 34506, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Andrea Cammelli, 2012. "Consolidamento ed eterogeneità nelle esperienze di studio dei laureati italiani," Working Papers 49, AlmaLaurea Inter-University Consortium.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Brain-drain; labour mobility; university quality; regional economic disparities.;

    JEL classification:

    • R58 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Regional Development Planning and Policy
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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