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Spatial disparities in developing countries: cities, regions and international trade

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  • Venables, Tony

Abstract

Spatial inequality in developing countries is due to the natural advantages of some regions relative to others and to the presence of agglomeration forces, leading to clustering of activity. This paper reviews and develops some simple models that capture these first and second nature economic geographies. The presence of increasing returns to scale in cities leads to urban structures that are not optimally sized. This depresses the return to job creation, possibly retarding development. Looking at the wider regional structure, development can be associated with large shifts in the location of activity as industry goes from being inward looking to being export oriented.

Suggested Citation

  • Venables, Tony, 2003. "Spatial disparities in developing countries: cities, regions and international trade," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2038, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:2038
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/2038/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    cities; spatial disparities; urbanisation; developing countries;

    JEL classification:

    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure

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