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Local Labour Markets and the Interregional Mobility of Italian University Students

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Listed:
  • Nicola Francesco Dotti
  • Ugo Fratesi
  • Camilla Lenzi
  • Marco Percoco

Abstract

This paper looks at a little-explored role that universities can play: that of representing a channel for brain gain, enabling regions to attract bright students who may decide to stay after they have graduated. In this way, universities can be a source of selective migration processes and possibly of diverging development paths, by augmenting the capability of economically dynamic regions to attract bright people from the lagging regions. In this paper, we argue that student mobility behaviour is a function not only of the quality of universities, but also of local labour market conditions in the destination locations. The paper relies on a gravity model, and shows that graduate migrations respond to several determinants, among which graduate job vacancies (that is, the dynamism of the local labour market) appear to be essential.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicola Francesco Dotti & Ugo Fratesi & Camilla Lenzi & Marco Percoco, 2013. "Local Labour Markets and the Interregional Mobility of Italian University Students," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(4), pages 443-468, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:specan:v:8:y:2013:i:4:p:443-468
    DOI: 10.1080/17421772.2013.833342
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Archibugi, Daniele & Lundvall, Bengt-Ake (ed.), 2001. "The Globalizing Learning Economy," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199241095.
    2. Attila Varga (ed.), 2009. "Universities, Knowledge Transfer and Regional Development," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 4250.
    3. J. Scott Long & Jeremy Freese, 2006. "Regression Models for Categorical Dependent Variables using Stata, 2nd Edition," Stata Press books, StataCorp LP, edition 2, number long2, April.
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