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Trade Liberalization Sequence for Sustained Economic Growth

  • Mo, Pak Hung

This paper delivers a simple model to generalize the successful trade liberalization experiences in East Asian countries as a strategy for attaining inclusive and sustained economic growth. The sequential approach, based on preserving existing production units while liberalizing export-oriented sectors, can be understood as a way to promote international interactions and learning by practice, to extend the limit of market and to introduce market incentive and pressure on all related agents for attaining dynamic efficiency. It provides a regular liberalization sequence to ignite and sustain economic growth for most lagged economies.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/28917/1/MPRA_paper_28917.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 28917.

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Date of creation: Jan 2011
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:28917
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  20. Pak Hung Mo, 2007. "Government Expenditures and Economic Growth: The Supply and Demand Sides," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 28(4), pages 497-522, December.
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