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Freedom as the key to prosperity: Lessons from the world's growth miracles and economic disasters

  • Hlavac, Marek
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    What do China, Estonia, Germany, India, Chile, South Korea and Slovakia all have in common? They have all enacted free-market reforms, and have seen their inhabitants’ living standards soar as a result. This essay describes how free-market policies have improved economic performance in these “growth miracles.” We will also draw contrasts with the policies adopted by governments in some “economic disasters” – countries that have failed to improve the economic well-being of their populations. The lessons we learn from these comparisons paint a clear picture: A country’s economy performs best when its policies lead to greater economic freedom, limit the role of government, and promote respect for the rule of law.

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    File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/25563/1/MPRA_paper_25563.pdf
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    Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 25563.

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    Date of creation: 15 Mar 2010
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    Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:25563
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    10. Edward C. Prescott, 2003. "Why do Americans work so much more than Europeans?," Staff Report 321, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
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    14. Fred H. Klopstock, 1949. "Monetary Reform in Western Germany," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 57, pages 277.
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