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Minimum wages in Australia: an analysis of the impact on small and medium sized businesses

Author

Listed:
  • Harding, Don
  • Harding, Glenys

Abstract

A survey of 1800 small and medium sized businesses is used to shed light on the number of workers covered by minimum wage legislation in Australia. Estimates are obtained and reported of the employment effects of changing the way in which minimum wages are set in Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Harding, Don & Harding, Glenys, 2004. "Minimum wages in Australia: an analysis of the impact on small and medium sized businesses," MPRA Paper 25, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:25
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/25/1/MPRA_paper_25.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lawrence F. Katz, 1986. "Efficiency Wage Theories: A Partial Evaluation," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1986, Volume 1, pages 235-290 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David Neumark & William Wascher, 2006. "Minimum Wages and Employment: A Review of Evidence from the New Minimum Wage Research," NBER Working Papers 12663, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Katalin Bodnár & Ludmila Fadejeva & Stefania Iordache & Liina Malk & Desislava Paskaleva & Jurga Pesliakaite & Nataša Todorovic Jemec & Peter Tóth & Robert Wyszynski, 2017. "How do firms adjust to rises in the minimum wage? Survey evidence from Central and Eastern Europe," Working and Discussion Papers WP 9/2017, Research Department, National Bank of Slovakia.
    3. Wang‐Sheng Lee & Sandy Suardi, 2011. "Minimum Wages and Employment: Reconsidering the Use of a Time Series Approach as an Evaluation Tool," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 49(Supplemen), pages 376-401, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Minimum wage; small and medium enterprises; random survey;

    JEL classification:

    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J81 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Working Conditions
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J33 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Compensation Packages; Payment Methods
    • J8 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards
    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy

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