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Impulse or propagation? How the tides turned in Business Cycle Theory

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  • J.P.G. Reijnders

Abstract

This paper contains a short history of business cycle theory. It is argued that in the course of time the emphasis shifted from a mainly exogenous to a mainly endogenous explanation of the cycle. After the integration of the two approaches in the so-called impulse and propagation theory, the balance kept shifting between an emphasis on endogenous propagation mechanism (Keynesians), the exogenous impulse mechanism (New Classicals) and back again to the propagation mechanism (New Keynesians). The shifts in emphasis in theory are accompanied by changes in the perceived window of opportunity for economic policy.

Suggested Citation

  • J.P.G. Reijnders, 2007. "Impulse or propagation? How the tides turned in Business Cycle Theory," Working Papers 07-07, Utrecht School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:use:tkiwps:0707
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    File URL: https://dspace.library.uu.nl/bitstream/handle/1874/31462/07-07.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Giampaolo Gabbi & Alesia Kalbaska & Alessandro Vercelli, 2014. "Factors generating and transmitting the financial crisis: The role of incentives: securitization and contagion," Working papers wpaper56, Financialisation, Economy, Society & Sustainable Development (FESSUD) Project.

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    Keywords

    Business Cycles; History of Economic Thought; Economic Policy;

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