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Regional Inflation in China

  • Nagayasu, Jun

This paper empirically examines developments in price and inflation in China from 1991 to 2005. Unlike most previous studies, their determinants were investigated in the panel data context, and our findings are as follows. First, using the panel cointegration method, we confirm a long-run relationship between price, money and output. Secondly, we provide evidence that inflation can be explained by economic fundamentals such as money, credits, productivity, and exchange rate growth. Furthermore, while an increased concern about regional discrepancies in recent years, this relationship is more sensitive to the sample period than to the region type. Notably, money does not seem to be closely associated with inflation over recent years.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/24722/1/MPRA_paper_24722.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 24722.

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Date of creation: Dec 2009
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:24722
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  1. Nagayasu, Jun & Liu, Ying, 2008. "Relative Prices and Wages in China: Evidence from a Panel of Provincial Data," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 23, pages 183-203.
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  7. Andreas Fischer, 2005. "Measuring Income Elasticity for Swiss Money Demand: What do the cantons say about financial innovation?," Working Papers 05.01, Swiss National Bank, Study Center Gerzensee.
  8. Westerlund Joakim, 2006. "Testing for Error Correction in Panel Data," Research Memorandum 056, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
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  11. Girardin, Eric, 1996. "Is There a Long Run Demand for Currency in China?," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 169-84.
  12. Peter Pedroni, 1999. "Critical Values for Cointegration Tests in Heterogeneous Panels with Multiple Regressors," Department of Economics Working Papers 2000-02, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  13. Bernard J Laurens & Rodolfo Maino, 2007. "China; Strengthening Monetary Policy Implementation," IMF Working Papers 07/14, International Monetary Fund.
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  16. Jose De Gregorio, 1991. "The Effects of Inflationon Economic Growth; Lessons From Latin America," IMF Working Papers 91/95, International Monetary Fund.
  17. Xu, Xinpeng, 2002. "Have the Chinese provinces become integrated under reform?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(2-3), pages 116-133.
  18. Dimitris K. Christopoulos & Efthymios G. Tsionas, 2005. "Productivity growth and inflation in Europe: Evidence from panel cointegration tests," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 137-150, January.
  19. Tarhan Feyzioglu & Nathan Porter & Elöd Takáts, 2009. "Interest Rate Liberalization in China," IMF Working Papers 09/171, International Monetary Fund.
  20. Jahangir Aziz & Xiangming Li, 2007. "China’s Changing Trade Elasticities," IMF Working Papers 07/266, International Monetary Fund.
  21. Stock, James H & Watson, Mark W, 1988. "Variable Trends in Economic Time Series," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 147-74, Summer.
  22. Montes-Negret, Fernando, 1995. "China's Credit Plan: An Overview," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(4), pages 25-42, Winter.
  23. Chen, Baizhu, 1997. "Long-Run Money Demand and Inflation in China," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 609-617, July.
  24. Alesina, Alberto & Summers, Lawrence H, 1993. "Central Bank Independence and Macroeconomic Performance: Some Comparative Evidence," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 25(2), pages 151-62, May.
  25. Sakamoto, Hiroshi & Islam, Nazrul, 2008. "Convergence across Chinese provinces: An analysis using Markov transition matrix," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 66-79, March.
  26. Loren Brandt & Xiaodong Zhu, 2000. "Redistribution in a Decentralized Economy: Growth and Inflation in China under Reform," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(2), pages 422-451, April.
  27. Hasan, Mohammad S., 1999. "Monetary Growth and Inflation in China: A Reexamination," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 669-685, December.
  28. Michael Funke, 2006. "Inflation In China: Modelling A Roller Coaster Ride," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(4), pages 413-429, December.
  29. Ligang Liu & Andrew Tsang, 2008. "Pass-through Effects of Global Commodity Prices on China's Inflation: An Empirical Investigation," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 16(6), pages 22-34.
  30. Renuka Mahadevan & John Asafu-Adjaye, 2006. "Is There A Case For Low Inflation-Induced Productivity Growth In Selected Asian Economies?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 24(2), pages 249-261, 04.
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