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Monetary Growth and Inflation in China: A Reexamination

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  • Hasan, Mohammad S.

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  • Hasan, Mohammad S., 1999. "Monetary Growth and Inflation in China: A Reexamination," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 669-685, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jcecon:v:27:y:1999:i:4:p:669-685
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. van den Berg, Hendrik & Jayanetti, Sanath C., 1993. "A novel test of the monetary approach using black market exchange rates and the Johansen-Juselius cointegration method," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 413-418.
    2. Feltenstein, Andrew & Farhadian, Ziba, 1987. "Fiscal Policy, Monetary Targets, and the Price Level in a Centrally Planned Economy: An Application to the Case of China," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 19(2), pages 137-156, May.
    3. Masih, Abul M. M. & Masih, Rumi, 1996. "Empirical tests to discern the dynamic causal chain in macroeconomic activity: new evidence from Thailand and Malaysia based on a multivariate cointegration/vector error-correction modeling approach," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 531-560, October.
    4. Granger, C. W. J., 1988. "Some recent development in a concept of causality," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1-2), pages 199-211.
    5. Spencer, David E, 1989. "Does Money Matter? The Robustness of Evidence from Vector Autoregressions," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 21(4), pages 442-454, November.
    6. Feltenstein, Andrew & Ha, Jiming, 1991. "Measurement of repressed inflation in China : The lack of coordination between monetary policy and price controls," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 279-294, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. ZHANG Chengsi, 2009. "Structural instability of China inflation dynamics," Frontiers of Economics in China, Higher Education Press, vol. 4(1), pages 30-45, March.
    2. Anne-Laure Delatte & Julien Fouquau & Carsten Holz, 2014. "Explaining money demand in China during the transition from a centrally planned to a market-based monetary system," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(3), pages 376-400, September.
    3. Michael Funke, 2005. "Inflation in Mainland China - Modelling a Roller Coaster Ride," Working Papers 152005, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    4. Ryota Kojima & Shinya Nakamura & Shinsuke Ohyama, 2005. "Inflation Dynamics in China," Bank of Japan Working Paper Series 05-E-9, Bank of Japan.
    5. repec:kap:iaecre:v:14:y:2008:i:1:p:36-47 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. GERLACH, Stefan & Peng, Wensheng, 2006. "Output gaps and inflation in Mainland China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 210-225.
    7. Delatte, Anne-Laure & Fouquau, Julien & Holz, Carsten, 2013. "Understanding Money Demand in the Transition from a Centrally Planned to a Market Economy," CEPR Discussion Papers 9721, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Zhang, Lingxiang, 2013. "Modeling China's inflation dynamics: An MRSTAR approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 440-446.
    9. Jisheng Yang, 2010. "Expectation, excess liquidity and inflation dynamics in China," Frontiers of Economics in China, Springer;Higher Education Press, vol. 5(3), pages 412-429, September.
    10. Zhang, Chengsi, 2011. "Inflation persistence, inflation expectations, and monetary policy in China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1-2), pages 622-629, January.
    11. Raghbendra Jha, 2008. "Inflation targeting in India: issues and prospects," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(2), pages 259-270.
    12. Zhang, Chengsi, 2013. "Money, housing, and inflation in China," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 75-87.
    13. Cargill, Thomas F. & Parker, Elliott, 2004. "Price deflation, money demand, and monetary policy discontinuity: a comparative view of Japan, China, and the United States," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 125-147, March.
    14. Tie Ying Liu & Chi Wei Su & Xu Zhao Jiang & Tsangyao Chang, 2015. "Is There Excess Liquidity in China?," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 23(3), pages 110-126, May.
    15. Aaron Mehrotra, 2008. "Demand for Money in Transition: Evidence from China’s Disinflation," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 14(1), pages 36-47, February.
    16. Jiranyakul, Komain, 2009. "Relationship among Money, Prices and Aggregate Output in Thailand," MPRA Paper 46963, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Chengsi Zhang, 2013. "Monetary Dynamics of Inflation in China," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(6), pages 737-760, June.
    18. Jeffrey Zax, 2014. "Housing allocations, imputed rents and inequality in urban China," ERSA conference papers ersa14p1682, European Regional Science Association.
    19. Akhand Akhtar Hossain, 2015. "The Evolution of Central Banking and Monetary Policy in the Asia-Pacific," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14611.
    20. Nagayasu, Jun, 2009. "Regional Inflation in China," MPRA Paper 24722, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    21. Chi-Wei Su & Jiao-Jiao Fan & Hsu-Ling Chang & Xiao-Lin Li, 2016. "Is there Causal Relationship between Money Supply Growth and Inflation in China? Evidence from Quantity Theory of Money," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(3), pages 702-719, August.
    22. Joerg Scheibe & David Vines, 2005. "A Phillips Curve For China," CAMA Working Papers 2005-02, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    23. Scheibe, Jörg & Vines, David, 2005. "A Phillips Curve for China," CEPR Discussion Papers 4957, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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