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Science, Bourgeois Dignity, and the Industrial Revolution


  • McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen


What happened to make for the factor of 16 were new ideas, what Mokyr calls “industrial Enlightenment.” But the Scientific Revolution did not suffice. Non-Europeans like the Chinese outstripped the West in science until quite late. Britain did not lead in science---yet clearly did in technology. Indeed, applied technology depended on science only a little even in 1900.

Suggested Citation

  • McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen, 2009. "Science, Bourgeois Dignity, and the Industrial Revolution," MPRA Paper 22308, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:22308

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Field, Alexander J., 2006. "Technological Change and U.S. Productivity Growth in the Interwar Years," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(01), pages 203-236, March.
    2. Alexander J. Field, 2003. "The Most Technologically Progressive Decade of the Century," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1399-1413, September.
    3. Easterlin,Richard A., 2004. "The Reluctant Economist," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521829748, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tommaso Ciarli & Valentina Meliciani & Maria Savona, 2012. "Knowledge Dynamics, Structural Change And The Geography Of Business Services," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(3), pages 445-467, July.

    More about this item


    scientific revolution; science; technology; industrial enlightenment; applied technology;

    JEL classification:

    • N00 - Economic History - - General - - - General
    • N7 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services

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