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Technological change and the roaring twenties: A neoclassical perspective

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  • Harrison, Sharon
  • Weder, Mark

Abstract

This paper addresses the causes of the Roaring Twenties in the United States. In particular, we use a version of the real business cycle model to test the hypothesis that an extraordinary pace of productivity growth was the driving factor. Our motivation comes from the abundance of evidence of significant technological progress during this period, fed by innovations in manufacturing and the widespread introduction of electricity. Our estimated total factor productivity series generate artificial model output that shows high conformity with the data: the model economy successfully replicates the boom years from 1922 to 1929.

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  • Harrison, Sharon & Weder, Mark, 2009. "Technological change and the roaring twenties: A neoclassical perspective," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 363-375, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:31:y:2009:i:3:p:363-375
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    Cited by:

    1. Dou Jiang & Mark Weder, 2021. "American business cycles 1889-1913: An accounting approach," CAMA Working Papers 2021-06, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
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    3. Peter A.G. van Bergeijk, 2019. "Deglobalization 2.0," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 18560, March.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Real business cycles Roaring twenties;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • N12 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - U.S.; Canada: 1913-

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