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Technological Change and U.S. Productivity Growth in the Interwar Years

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  • FIELD, ALEXANDER J.

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  • Field, Alexander J., 2006. "Technological Change and U.S. Productivity Growth in the Interwar Years," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(01), pages 203-236, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:66:y:2006:i:01:p:203-236_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Henry Willebald, 2013. "Distributive patterns in settler economies: agrarian income inequality during the first globalization (1870-1913)," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 13-05, Instituto de Economía - IECON.
    2. Klein, Alexander & Otsuy, Keisuke, 2013. "Efficiency, Distortions and Factor Utilization during the Interwar Period," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 147, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    3. Harrison, Sharon & Weder, Mark, 2009. "Technological change and the roaring twenties: A neoclassical perspective," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 363-375, September.
    4. Field, Alexander J., 2009. "US economic growth in the gilded age," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 173-190, March.
    5. Alexander J. Field, 2008. "The impact of the Second World War on US productivity growth -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 61(3), pages 672-694, August.
    6. Cristiano Andrea Ristuccia & Adam Tooze, 2013. "Machine tools and mass production in the armaments boom: Germany and the United States, 1929–44," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 66(4), pages 953-974, November.
    7. Alex Klein & Keisuke Otsu, 2013. "Efficiency, Distortions and Factor Utilization during the Interwar Period," Studies in Economics 1317, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    8. repec:dgr:rugggd:gd-108 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Llopis, Maria Teresa Sanchis, 2016. "Did electricity drive Spain’s “most progressive decade”?," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 309, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    10. Demeulemeester, Jean-Luc, 2009. "Comment on "US Economic growth in the gilded age"," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 191-199, March.
    11. Greasley, David & Hanley, Nicholas & Kunnas, Jan & McLaughlin, Eoin & Oxley, Les & Warde, Paul, 2013. "Comprehensive investment and future well-being in the USA, 1869-2000," Stirling Economics Discussion Papers 2013-06, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
    12. Adam S. Posen, 2010. "The Central Banker's Case for Doing More," Policy Briefs PB10-24, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    13. McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen, 2009. "Science, Bourgeois Dignity, and the Industrial Revolution," MPRA Paper 22308, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Herman De Jong & Pieter Woltjer, 2011. "Depression dynamics: a new estimate of the Anglo‐American manufacturing productivity gap in the interwar period," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 64(2), pages 472-492, May.
    15. Landon-Lane, John S. & Robertson, Peter E., 2009. "Long-run growth in the OECD: A test of the parallel growth paths hypothesis," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 346-355, July.
    16. Alexopoulos, Michelle & Cohen, Jon, 2009. "Measuring our ignorance, one book at a time: New indicators of technological change, 1909-1949," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(4), pages 450-470, May.
    17. repec:dgr:rugggd:gd-140 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Alexander J. Field, 2011. "The Adversity/Hysteresis Effect: Depression-Era Productivity Growth in the U.S. Railroad Sector," NBER Chapters,in: The Rate and Direction of Inventive Activity Revisited, pages 579-606 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Chin Alycia & Warusawitharana Missaka, 2010. "Financial Market Shocks during the Great Depression," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-27, September.

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