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Some empirical evidence of the euro area monetary policy

  • Forte, Antonio

In this paper I try to find some empirical evidence of the European Central Bank’s behaviour from its outset, January 1999, to the mid 2007, using a Taylor-type rule. I test a new and simple method for estimating the output gap in order to avoid problems linked with the estimate of the potential output. Moreover, I analyse the significance of some explanatory variables in order to understand what the basis of the E.C.B. monetary policy decisions are. Finally, I find an important evidence of the role of the Euro-Dollar nominal exchange rate in the conduct of the Euro Area monetary policy.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/21785/1/MPRA_paper_21785.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 21785.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:21785
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  1. Kai Carstensen, 2006. "Estimating the ECB Policy Reaction Function," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 7, pages 1-34, 02.
  2. Richard Clarida & Jordi Galí & Mark Gertler, 1997. "The science of monetary policy: A new Keynesian perspective," Economics Working Papers 356, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Apr 1999.
  3. Robert Tchaidze & Alina Carare, 2005. "The Use and Abuse of Taylor Rules; How Precisely Can We Estimate them?," IMF Working Papers 05/148, International Monetary Fund.
  4. Laurence Ball, 1997. "Efficient rules for monetary policy," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series G97/3, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  5. Richard Clarida & Jordi Gali & Mark Gertler, 1998. "Monetary policy rules in practice," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Mar.
  6. Stephen G. Cecchetti & Guy Debelle, 2006. "Has the inflation process changed?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 21(46), pages 311-352, 04.
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