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Has the inflation process changed?

Author

Listed:
  • Stephen Cecchetti

    (Brandeis University - International Business School)

  • Guy Debelle

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

Abstract

On 18-19 June 2004, the BIS held a conference on "Understanding Low Inflation and Deflation". This event brought together central bankers, academics and market practitioners to exchange views on this issue (see the conference programme in this document). This paper was presented at the workshop. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not those of the BIS.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Cecchetti & Guy Debelle, 2005. "Has the inflation process changed?," BIS Working Papers 185, Bank for International Settlements.
  • Handle: RePEc:bis:biswps:185
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Calvo, Guillermo A., 1983. "Staggered prices in a utility-maximizing framework," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 383-398, September.
    2. Gali, Jordi & Gertler, Mark, 1999. "Inflation dynamics: A structural econometric analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 195-222, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    inflation persistence; Monetary Policy Regimes; inflation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J52 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Dispute Resolution: Strikes, Arbitration, and Mediation

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