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Two-sided Intergenerational Transfer Policy and Economic Development: A Politico-economic Approach

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  • Naito, Katsuyuki

Abstract

We consider an overlapping generations model with public education and social security where the overall size of these policies is determined in a repeated voting game. We investigate the interaction between the politically determined policies and economic development in a Markov perfect equilibrium. The following results are obtained. First, the level of human capital determines whether these policies are sustained in the Markov perfect equilibrium. Second, if the level of initial human capital is sufficiently high, human capital grows forever. In contrast, if the level of initial human capital is low, the economy might be caught in a poverty trap.

Suggested Citation

  • Naito, Katsuyuki, 2010. "Two-sided Intergenerational Transfer Policy and Economic Development: A Politico-economic Approach," MPRA Paper 21020, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:21020
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ono, Tetsuo & Uchida, Yuki, 2018. "Human capital, public debt, and economic growth: A political economy analysis," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 1-14.
    2. Ono, Tetsuo & Uchida, Yuki, 2016. "Pensions, education, and growth: A positive analysis," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 127-143.
    3. Tetsuo Ono & Yuki Uchida, 2018. "Capital Income Taxation, Economic Growth, and the Politics of Public Education," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 18-05, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics.
    4. Tetsuo Ono, 2015. "Public education and social security: a political economy approach," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 1-25, February.
    5. Tetsuo Ono, 2014. "Economic Growth and the Politics of Intergenerational Redistribution," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 14-17, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics.
    6. Yuki Uchida & Tetsuo Ono, 2018. "Generational Conflict and Education Politics: Implications for Growth and Welfare," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 18-05-Rev.2, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics, revised Apr 2019.
    7. Katsuyuki Naito & Keigo Nishida, 2017. "Multistage public education, voting, and income distribution," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 120(1), pages 65-78, January.
    8. Bishnu, Monisankar & Wang, Min, 2017. "The political intergenerational welfare state," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 93-110.
    9. Torben M. Andersen & Joydeep Bhattacharya, 2013. "The Intergenerational Welfare State," CESifo Working Paper Series 4359, CESifo Group Munich.
    10. Casamatta, G. & Batté, L., 2016. "The Political Economy of Population Aging," Handbook of the Economics of Population Aging, in: Piggott, John & Woodland, Alan (ed.), Handbook of the Economics of Population Aging, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 0, pages 381-444, Elsevier.
    11. Monisankar Bishnu & Min Wang, 2013. "The Political intergenerational welfare state: A Unified framework," Indian Statistical Institute, Planning Unit, New Delhi Discussion Papers 13-08, Indian Statistical Institute, New Delhi, India.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Public education; Social security; Markov perfect equilibrium; Economic development;

    JEL classification:

    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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