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The role of education in regional innovation activities and economic growth: spatial evidence from China

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  • Chi, Wei
  • Qian, Xiaoye

Abstract

This study examines one of the channels through which education may contribute to economic growth, specifically, innovation. Endogenous growth theory has long suggested that human capital lead to greater innovation and, through technology innovation and diffusion, contribute to economic growth. However, there is little evidence on the role of human capital in innovation. Using the Chinese provincial data from 1997 to 2006, we show that workers’ tertiary education is significantly and positively related to provincial innovative activities measured by invention patent applications per capita. This result does not vary when spatial dependence is allowed in the estimation. Thus, we find strong and robust evidence for the prediction of endogenous growth theory regarding the effect of human capital on innovation. However, we do not find the consistently significant effect of innovation on growth. This finding may, however, relate to the growth pattern in China.

Suggested Citation

  • Chi, Wei & Qian, Xiaoye, 2009. "The role of education in regional innovation activities and economic growth: spatial evidence from China," MPRA Paper 15779, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:15779
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/15779/1/MPRA_paper_15779.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Leten, Bart & Landoni, Paolo & Van Looy, Bart, 2014. "Science or graduates: How do firms benefit from the proximity of universities?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(8), pages 1398-1412.
    2. Tommaso Agasisti & Cristian Barra & Roberto Zotti, 2017. "Research, knowledge transfer and innovation: the effect of Italian universities’ efficiency on the local economic development 2006-2012," Working papers 60, Società Italiana di Economia Pubblica.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; Human Capital; Innovation; Paten; Economic Growth; Spatial Analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights

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