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The composition of human capital and economic growth: Evidence from China using dynamic panel data analysis

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  • Zhang, Chuanguo
  • Zhuang, Lihuan

Abstract

This study examines the effect of the composition of human capital on economic growth in China, using the Generalized Methods of Moments (GMM) method. The results show that tertiary education plays a more important role than primary and secondary education on economic growth in China. Moreover, the role of the composition of human capital on regional economic growth is relevant to the level of development. The more developed provinces benefit more from tertiary education, while underdeveloped ones depend more on primary and secondary education.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhang, Chuanguo & Zhuang, Lihuan, 2011. "The composition of human capital and economic growth: Evidence from China using dynamic panel data analysis," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 165-171, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:22:y:2011:i:1:p:165-171
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Chani, Muhammad Irfan & Hassan, Mahboob Ul & Shahid, Muhammad, 2012. "Human capital formation and economic development in Pakistan: an empirical analysis," MPRA Paper 38925, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Shahid Yusuf, 2012. "From Technological Catch-up to Innovation : The Future of China’s GDP Growth," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12781, The World Bank.
    3. repec:eee:rensus:v:80:y:2017:i:c:p:1123-1137 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Yang, Shanlin & Bai, Yu & Wang, Sufeng & Feng, Nanping, 2013. "Evaluating the transformation of China’s industrial development mode during 2000–2009," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 585-594.
    5. Bahar Bayraktar-Sağlam, 2016. "The Stages of Human Capital and Economic Growth: Does the Direction of Causality Matter for the Rich and the Poor?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 127(1), pages 243-302, May.
    6. Chen, Xi & Funke, Michael, 2013. "The dynamics of catch-up and skill and technology upgrading in China," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 38(PB), pages 465-480.
    7. Mine Yilmazer & Serkan Çinar, 2015. "Human Capabilities and Economic Growth: A Comparative Human Capability Index," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 5(4), pages 843-853.
    8. Zhang, Chuanguo & Tan, Zheng, 2016. "The relationships between population factors and China's carbon emissions: Does population aging matter?," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 1018-1025.
    9. Haizheng Li & Junzi He & Qinyi Liu & Barbara M. Fraumeni & Xiang Zheng, 2016. "Regional Distribution and Dynamics of Human Capital in China 1985-2014: Education, Urbanization, and Aging of the Population," NBER Working Papers 22906, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. repec:rss:jnljee:v4i1p1 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Maru?a Pescu (Beca) & Camelia ?tefan (Baraba?), 2016. "The Effects of Gaps and Disparities on Economic Growth. A Study of 10 Former Socialist Countries from the CEE, Members of the EU," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 18(43), pages 592-592, August.
    12. Krume Nikoloski & Trajko Miceski & Vlatko Paceskoski, 2015. "The Impact Of The Capital On The Economic Development Of The Developing Countries," Annals - Economy Series, Constantin Brancusi University, Faculty of Economics, vol. 6, pages 76-81, December.
    13. Arshad, Shahzad & Munir, Kashif, 2015. "Factor Accumulation and Economic Growth in Pakistan: Incorporating Human Capital," MPRA Paper 67012, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Ben Salha, Ousama, 2013. "Does economic globalization affect the level and volatility of labor demand by skill? New insights from the Tunisian manufacturing industries," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 572-597.
    15. Gang Chen & Brett Inder & Bruce Hollingsworth, 2014. "Health Investment And Economic Output In Regional China," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(2), pages 261-274, April.
    16. Jalil, Abdul & Idrees, Muhammad, 2013. "Modeling the impact of education on the economic growth: Evidence from aggregated and disaggregated time series data of Pakistan," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 383-388.

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