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Health Shocks and Retirement: The Role of Welfare State Institutions

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  • Datta Gupta, Nabanita
  • Larsen, Mona

Abstract

We investigate the effect of an acute health shock on retirement among elderly male workers in Denmark, 1991-1999, and in particular whether various welfare state programs and institutions impinge on the retirement effect. The results show that an acute health event increases the retirement chances of elderly male workers by 8%, and that this increase in the baseline retirement probability is not affected by eligibility to early exit programs and persists even after accounting for selection due to take-up of disability pension. Neither is it affected by the relatively long duration of sickness benefits in Denmark nor by the promotion of corporate social responsibility initiatives since the mid-1990s. In the late 1990s, however, the retirement rate following a health shock is reduced to 3% with the introduction of the subsidized employment program (fleksjob) but this effect is on the margin of being significant. For the most part, the retirement effect following a health shock seems to be immune to the availability of a multitude of government programs for older workers in Denmark.

Suggested Citation

  • Datta Gupta, Nabanita & Larsen, Mona, 2007. "Health Shocks and Retirement: The Role of Welfare State Institutions," MPRA Paper 15497, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:15497
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/15497/1/MPRA_paper_15497.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Michael Baker & Mark Stabile & Catherine Deri, 2004. "What Do Self-Reported, Objective, Measures of Health Measure?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(4).
    2. Regina T. Riphahn, 1999. "Income and employment effects of health shocks A test case for the German welfare state," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(3), pages 363-389.
    3. Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 2004. "Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Micro-Estimation," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number grub04-1, April.
    4. Debra S. Dwyer & Jianting Hu, "undated". "Retirement Expectations and Realizations: The Role of Health Shocks and Economic Factors," Pension Research Council Working Papers 98-18, Wharton School Pension Research Council, University of Pennsylvania.
    5. Paul Bingley & Nabanita Datta Gupta & Peder J. Pedersen, 2004. "The Impact of Incentives on Retirement in Denmark," NBER Chapters,in: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Micro-Estimation, pages 153-234 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Courtney C. Coile & Kevin Milligan, 2005. "How Portfolios Evolve After Retirement: The Effect of Health Shocks," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2005-17, Center for Retirement Research, revised Dec 2005.
    7. Kathryn H. Anderson & Richard V. Burkhauser, 1985. "The Retirement-Health Nexus: A New Measure of an Old Puzzle," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 20(3), pages 315-330.
    8. Courtney C. Coile, 2004. "Health Shocks and Couples' Labor Supply Decisions," NBER Working Papers 10810, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:wfo:wstudy:46672 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Pierre Lefebvre & Philip Merrigan & Pierre-Carl Michaud, 2011. "The Recent Evolution of Retirement Patterns in Canada," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 287, McMaster University.
    3. Zucchelli, E. & Harris, M. & Zhao, X., 2012. "Ill-health and transitions to part-time work and self-employment among older workers," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 12/04, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    4. repec:ipf:psejou:v:41:y:2017:i:1:p:109-128 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Harris, M.N. & Zhao, X. & Zucchelli, E., 2016. "The dynamics of health and labour market transitions at older ages: evidence from a multi-state model," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/30, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    retirement; health shocks; welfare state programs; medical diagnoses;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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